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  #1  
Old 29-10-17, 11:49
Paul Dutton Paul Dutton is offline
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Default Tracing relatives in toronto

Hi guys
Trying to trace any relatives of this Canadian soldier for a Dutch researcher friend of mine.
All we know is he was from Toronto and his War Graves info.
Any leads or pointers please?
Any good reference places, museums etc.
Thanks in advance
Paul

Quote:
Hello Paul, try to trace next of kin of the following soldier:, thnks in advance, https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/c...hedley-morden/
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  #2  
Old 01-11-17, 01:36
Stuart Fedak Stuart Fedak is offline
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Default Cpl HEDLEY MORDEN SHAW LSR(M)

ref: Item: HEDLEY MORDEN SHAW

Surname:
SHAW

Given Name(s):
HEDLEY MORDEN

Age:
32

Date of Birth:
04 Mar 1913

Date of Death:
11 Feb 1945

Rank:
Corporal

Unit:
Lake Superior Regiment (Motor), R.C.I.C.

Force:
Army

Service Number:
B119052

Reference:
RG 24

Volume:
29232

Extra Information:
Son of William Le Roy Shaw and Wilhelmina C. Shaw; husband of Jean Shaw, of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Item Number:
32202
Ref: http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discove...IdNumber=32202&

The Military file for Cpl HEDLEY MORDEN SHAW LSR(M) will be held in Ottawa, and can be accessed. That should give additional information.
http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discove...roduction.aspx

The abridged military file (if available) for Cpl HEDLEY MORDEN SHAW LSR(M) will be available on-line at ancestry.ca. The complete hard file will be accessible only in Ottawa, which will give additional information. Further access details are on the LAC web page.

http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discove...ice-files.aspx

Usually around remembrance day, Ancestry opens up more of the military data base files.


The complete Lake Superior Regiment (M) War Diary is kept at the Thunder Bay Historical Museum. They hold many of the records of the LSR(M), in addition to what is held by Archives Canada.

Ref: https://www.thunderbaymuseum.com/


I looked through the Lake Superior Regiment (Motor) War diary for 11-Feb-1945 and the events of the day are described in detail on sheets 6 and 7, with mention of Cpl HEDLEY MORDEN SHAW. The LSR (M) was at s'Hertogenbosch at the time and Cpl HEDLEY MORDEN SHAW was on the raid party to cross the Maas river. According to the War Diary "...the only traces that could be found of the men was some clothing belonging to Cpl Shaw and it was presumed he had attempted to swim across....". In review of other documents produced after WWII, Cpl HEDLEY MORDEN SHAW was listed as missing.

My father Cpl Michael Fedak, LSR(M), in his book, makes mention of Cpl HEDLEY MORDEN SHAW and the events of Sunday, February 11, 1945 on pages 169 - 181.

In 2005, I attended the 50th anniversary of the Liberation of Holland with my father. We actually visited the site at the Mass river where the LSR(M)patrol of 11-Feb-1945 was put across the river from s'Hertogenbosch and stopped for some photographs. While my father was describing the events, a farmer came out from his house, and asked if we were discussing where the Canadians were killed in front of their house. It turned out, that the father of the farmer, owned the house during WWII and witnessed the events. My father assisted the padre in the burial of the remains of those who were killed in that raid.

There is a grave marker in Toronto for a Hedley Morden Shaw
Name: Hedley M. Shaw Death Date: 11 Feb 1945 Cemetery: Forest Lawn Mausoleum Burial or Cremation Place: Toronto, Toronto Municipality, Ontario, Canada

Ref: https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/f...GRid=128142010

Please contact me by private message, with the contact information of the researcher in Holland, with details on the sort of information they are looking for. I prefer to correspond with them directly.

Regards
Stuart Fedak
Attached Thumbnails
Hedley_Shaw_128142010_1397826011.jpg  
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  #3  
Old 01-11-17, 02:51
Bob Phillips Bob Phillips is offline
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Default Amazed!

Once again I am amazed at the resource that MLU is to so many , and the equally amazing people that assist with questions and queries. Well done!
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  #4  
Old 01-11-17, 03:11
cletrac's Avatar
cletrac cletrac is offline
David Pope
 
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Default

Here's the 1921 census and an Ancestry page.
Attached Thumbnails
1921_100-e003052578(1).jpg   hedley shaw.jpg  
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1940 Cab 11 C8 Wireless with 1A2 box & 11 set
1940 Cab 11 C8 cab and chassis
1940 Cab 11 C15 with 2A1 & Motley mount & Lewis gun
1940 Cab 11 F15A w/ Chev rear ends
1941 Cab 12 F15A
1942-44 Cab 13 F15A x 5
1942 cab 13 F15A with 2B1 box
1943 cab 13 F15A with 2H1 box
1943 Cab 13 C8A HUP
1944 Cab 13 C15A with 2C1 box
1943 Cletrac M2 High Speed Tractor
MkII Bren gun carrier chassis x 2
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  #5  
Old 01-11-17, 04:07
Stuart Fedak Stuart Fedak is offline
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Default Ancestry.ca

David, recently I have been using Ancestry.ca for genealogy work. The Ottawa Public Library has a version that can be accessed when in the library. It has access to most but not all of the features of their service. The library version will not permit access to some details of the family pages, and you can not contact owners of the family pages.

Can you comment if you find having access to the full services of ancestry meets you personal needs? There are so many potential genealogy services around. The ancestry service seems to have a good selection of databases useful for Canadian and European databases related to immigration.

Your thoughts?
Stuart

Additional notes: When there is a family page, like the example that was posted by David, it will be managed by some one, most likely who is related to the subject of the page. With a membership to Ancestry, it is possible to contact the person managing the page off line, and sharing additional details. This is the power of these groups and pages. Sometimes, the person posting is no longer around, but at least the page is available. Information on those who are still alive is usually private on the pages.

Stuart

Last edited by Stuart Fedak; 01-11-17 at 04:12.
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  #6  
Old 01-11-17, 04:18
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cletrac cletrac is offline
David Pope
 
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Location: Eston, Sask, Canada
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Default

I find the Ancestry.com site very useful.
If someone is on the 1921 or earlier censuses you can easily trace the ancestors of most of them back a couple of hundred years.
I traced my Pope ancestors back to the early 1500s in England.
Here's some pages from Hedley's military records.
Attached Thumbnails
44486_83024005549_0836-00201.jpg   44486_83024005549_0836-00212.jpg   44486_83024005549_0836-00214.jpg  
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1940 Cab 11 C8 Wireless with 1A2 box & 11 set
1940 Cab 11 C8 cab and chassis
1940 Cab 11 C15 with 2A1 & Motley mount & Lewis gun
1940 Cab 11 F15A w/ Chev rear ends
1941 Cab 12 F15A
1942-44 Cab 13 F15A x 5
1942 cab 13 F15A with 2B1 box
1943 cab 13 F15A with 2H1 box
1943 Cab 13 C8A HUP
1944 Cab 13 C15A with 2C1 box
1943 Cletrac M2 High Speed Tractor
MkII Bren gun carrier chassis x 2

Last edited by cletrac; 01-11-17 at 04:48.
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  #7  
Old 01-11-17, 10:39
Paul Dutton Paul Dutton is offline
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Default

WOW guys, thank you so much, great information there to be started with.
The power of MLU just keeps getting better by the day.
I will pass all this onto Philip, my Dutch friend and any contact information given.
I'm sure this will help in any research he is doing.
Many thanks again, much appreciated my friends

Paul
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  #8  
Old 01-11-17, 13:46
Stuart Fedak Stuart Fedak is offline
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Default Lake Superior Regiment (M)

Paul, glad that MLU could be of help. In that patrol, one of my father's friends lost his foot when he stepped on a mine. He was carried to the shore to be evacuated, and the fellow carrying him, broke his own foot. The fellow who lost his foot, eventually moved to Hamilton, Ontario. When I lived near Hamilton, and my father visited me, he would come over to my house to visit my father. So I got to hear first hand some of the details of that patrol.

One of the LSR(M) soldiers was injured and on the German side of the Maas River. He used a lighter to signal at night that he was on the shore. the LSR (M) were able to mount a patrol the next night to go pick him up.

It is unfortunate that Hedley did not just stay in hiding until the LSR(M) returned to pick him up. It was felt that he attempted to swim across the river, which was very cold at that time of the year.

I guess I am like many on this group, who were fascinated to hear the stories of the those who served in WWII. My father was very active in the LSR(M) old boys club of the regiment, so I got to hear lots of stories around the kitchen table.

Cheers!
Stuart
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  #9  
Old 01-11-17, 21:54
Paul Dutton Paul Dutton is offline
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Default

Thank you Stuart
I hear great stories all the time of heroism beyond what we were mortals could imagine.
These stories need telling and passed onto the next generation before they are lost in the ether forever.
If I pass you Philips email would you contact him please with anything you know.
For some reason he is not getting my links.
Very much appreciated
Paul
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  #10  
Old 02-11-17, 01:32
Stuart Fedak Stuart Fedak is offline
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Default Just got off the phone

I just got off the phone with the Lake Superior Regiment (Motor) member who was on the patrol with Cpl HEDLEY MORDEN SHAW LSR(M) at the time he was reported missing in action. We briefly chatted, and I have made arrangements to do a follow-up phone call this week. He mentioned with Remembrance Day coming up, he was thinking of that patrol. He is now 92 years old and still living in his home. He said that the events of that day are still very clear.

Regards,
Stuart
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  #11  
Old 02-11-17, 02:32
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cletrac cletrac is offline
David Pope
 
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Default

Here's the statements from two members of the patrol.
Attached Thumbnails
44486_83024005549_0836-00200.jpg   44486_83024005549_0836-00198.jpg  
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1940 Cab 11 C8 Wireless with 1A2 box & 11 set
1940 Cab 11 C8 cab and chassis
1940 Cab 11 C15 with 2A1 & Motley mount & Lewis gun
1940 Cab 11 F15A w/ Chev rear ends
1941 Cab 12 F15A
1942-44 Cab 13 F15A x 5
1942 cab 13 F15A with 2B1 box
1943 cab 13 F15A with 2H1 box
1943 Cab 13 C8A HUP
1944 Cab 13 C15A with 2C1 box
1943 Cletrac M2 High Speed Tractor
MkII Bren gun carrier chassis x 2

Last edited by cletrac; 02-11-17 at 02:37.
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  #12  
Old 02-11-17, 04:34
Stuart Fedak Stuart Fedak is offline
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Default Some additional information

Some additional information on the patrol from the book "Letters to Leah"... Note, the author was a driver/radio operator with the LSR(M).

It is just past midnight and I am on duty again,
having volunteered to stay on duty because I know
I won’t be able to sleep after what I can best
describe as a disastrous night for us. I even had a
shot of rum with the boys, something I have only
done once before. It did not help. It took over an
hour after the patrol to piece together the events,
but I will give them to you as they appear at this
moment.
Our patrol started on time in a light rain with
Lt. Hugh Garling in charge of 21 men, made up of
a beachhead party and a raiding party, with the
main objective being the taking of a prisoner. An
immediate problem arose when the beachhead
boat sprung a leak, forcing them to return and
switch to an alternate boat. On crossing, they had,
difficulty finding the raiding party and its boat, but
eventually did and the raid proceeded inland, with
Don Bliss carrying the wireless set and the
beachhead party connected to me via the telephone
wires they pulled across.
In short order, the raiding party came across a
sentry post in a fox hole just as the sentry was
being relieved by a replacement that had just come
out of a nearby hut. They watched until the
changeover had taken place, then moved in on the
new sentry before his eyes became accustomed to
the darkness. They challenged him in German to
come out, throwing 3 grenades beyond him to
confuse him. The ruse worked and the Jerry came
out with his hands up in surrender. Having attained
their objective, they turned to return to the boats,
whereupon Pte. John Brown stepped on a Schu
Mine, which blew off his left foot. Having been
alerted, the Germans opened up with machine
guns, forcing our group to take to the ground and
to return fire. At this time another of our men, Pte.
Alf Bevan set off a second mine by striking it with
his hand as he hit the ground. His hand was
shredded and he received some head wounds.
When the explosion and gunfire settled down, our
men started back to the boats with Lt. Garling
carrying Brown. Shortly, Garling stepped into a
hole and broke his ankle. Brown was then carried
by Bliss and one other man. The survivors and
wounded plus the prisoner made their way back to
the boats and re-crossed under artillery cover we
called down and support from our mortars and
medium machine guns.
On our side of the river a personnel check was
made which showed that 4 men were missing, Cpl.
Norm Tyerman, Cpl. Hedley Shaw, Pte. Lorne
Doberthein and Pte. George Preston. A 5 man
search party re-crossed the river, but only found
Cpl. Shaw’s rifle, sniper jacket and rubber boots
on the shore, an indication that he probably tried to
swim across the extremely cold river. They did not
search inland as the Jerries continued intermittent
machine gunning.
Note: The 5 man search party was lead by Cpl/ Sgt. Charlie Byce, twice decorated ...

two medals for bravery, the Military Medal for his work on patrols on the Maas and the Distinguished Conduct Medal for his heroism in the Hochwald.
I was in our hut after the patrol as our
casualties were being prepared for evacuation.
Bevan was sitting on a bench staring unbelieving
at his wounded hand, swearing that he had helped
to paddle the boat back, with the bare remains of
hand. The German prisoner was also in a daze,
feeling his face and hands, looking for injuries. He
had actually been sprayed with fragments of
Bakelite from a #80 Grenade, which is a very
small one, consisting of a small charge in a
Bakelite casing. It only has 3 metal parts, but a
loud blast which certainly worked to perfection on
this man. Pte. Zeeb, a driver who speaks German
was on the patrol and was the one who threw the
grenade and challenged the Jerry to surrender. He
now tried his best to explain to the prisoner that
his wounds were just superficial, but the man kept
feeling his body, eventually breaking into a small
smile of relief.

The prisoner taken proved to be an
exceptionally good one, as he was wearing his
officer’s rain coat. In the pocket was a map of the
area showing their defences. The officer was part
of their rearguard, helping to show the new troops
the area. His driver offered to do a shift of guard
so the officer offered the use of his coat because of
the rain. Brigade will be pleased.
Our communications worked beautifully
tonight. Don kept us informed of their position by
prearranged code words and Major Styffe kept the
artillery advised of the next possible target so that
when Don asked for covering fire, the artillery was
already aimed at it and the shells came looping
over in no time. Great work. I was pleased.
I think you will understand my feelings when
I tell you I knew most of the men lost tonight.
More facts may come out when the wounded are
interviewed in hospital. God and I are going to
have to talk about it. It’s been a long day.
Goodnight, Leah. We are all very tired.

Dear Leah,
After writing my last letter a couple of nights
ago, I stayed on duty till 0400 hours doing more
writing and unwinding from the excitement we
had been through. Sleep came easy after that, but
not for long. Just before daybreak, the boys at
Gewande spotted a faint light on the enemy side of
the Maas which turned out to be the flame from a
lighter or matches being struck. It was
immediately reported to our H.Q. and within a
short time by the faint light of dawn, with
binoculars, they had spotted a man on the enemy
side of the river hidden from them by the dike
paralleling the river. He cautiously waved
periodically, being careful not to expose himself to
the enemy. It was obvious that he was one of our
missing men from Sunday’s patrol.
Needless to say there was much concern for
our man’s safety and wellbeing. The morning was
cold with periods of mist on the water, at times
obliterating him from view and during the day,
light rain and some sleet fell. He was not identified
with binoculars, but appeared unhurt as he crawled
to the water for a drink a number of times and
even looked over the dike at the enemy side. He
continued to wave throughout the day, indicating a
desire to be rescued.

During the day, a number of options to rescue
our man were considered, including smoking off
the river to shield a rescue attempt and a group of
volunteers, including Padre Leng, who offered to
cross in a boat flying a Red Cross flag to pick him
up. Unfortunately, Brigade Headquarters would
not approve a daylight rescue at all as it would be
risking a number of men for the sake of one,
particularly since he appeared not to be injured. It
was also felt that the Germans might not respect
the Red Cross flag option, as recently some of our
supporting guns had accidentally hit a building in
Hoenzadriel with a salvo of shells while it was
flying their Red Cross flag. While it was an error
on the part of the officer giving the guns firing
orders, the enemy might well have thought it to be
deliberate. The decision was therefore made to
send a boat across in the evening as soon as light
conditions permitted. The day passed slowly for
all concerned with conditions as normal as
possible. There was no attempt at any visual signs
to our man as the enemy might twig to them and
take action.
At 1845 hours, a group of strong paddlers
made a quick crossing of the river, returning with
Pte. Lorne Doberthien, one of our missing men,
whose left foot and lower leg had been blown off
by a mine he had stepped on. He reported that he
heard Cpl. Norm Tyerman and Pte. George
Preston died from mine wounds and that Cpl.
Hedley Shaw had first applied a shell dressing to
his wound, then left, by which time the main body
of the patrol had returned to the boats. Lorne had
shown amazing strength and determination, having
crawled several hundred yards to the river and
then endured many hours of pain and severe
weather with just a chocolate bar that he carried,
and some river water. We had prepared hot soup
and coffee along with a quick meal for him, but
Doberthien was quickly moved by jeep and
stretcher to our R.A.P. for evacuation to hospital in
surprisingly good spirits. A very brave man,
indeed.
While Doberthien’s story shed light on how
Tyerman and Preston died, it did not entirely settle
the question as to how many mines had been set
off. Certainly at least three, but possibly two more,
all on ground our men had moved over going
inland. We will never know.







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  #13  
Old 02-11-17, 05:56
maple_leaf_eh maple_leaf_eh is offline
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Default I am amazed!

The clarity in those accounts, and the detachment of the formal letters. That, and that they were found so quickly. I guess the Internet isn't just for videos of cute kittens and spreading conspiracy theories.
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  #14  
Old 02-11-17, 06:33
Stuart Fedak Stuart Fedak is offline
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Default The pencil vs the Internet

Terry,
Thanks for those comments. My father wrote literally hundreds of letters during WWII, and his family sent him dozens of pencils in mail parcels. Not only did he write personal letters, but helped summarize information at HQ from the daily radio/telephone reports. His job was also to upkeep the maps on various positions. Once the war was over, he assisted in the production of the LSR(M) publication Fifty Forum which was a regimental news weekly they put out while in Europe, until they came back to Canada. This writing continued post WWII with the LSR(M) regimental publications. The Manitoba branch of the LSR(M) Old Boys Club sometimes met in the family kitchen, so I heard many of these stories first hand. Eventually my father wrote them using the war diary, and his own recollections. The LSR(M) regiment was interested in the work, specifically because it was not the detached writing style of the officers.

As I mentioned, I just spoke tonight to one of the fellows who stepped on the land mine, and I will follow up with him this week for more information. One of the other jobs my dad had was assisting the padre in preparing the letters that would be sent to family, and in the burial of casualties.

I have been working on some genealogy projects, and have been reading and re-reading some of my fathers writings, and going through the war diary, so when the original poster asked his questions, I already knew the story. I have two photographs that my father took of the two young men who each lost a foot in that raid. That and having one of them visit in my house, makes it very real...........

Stuart
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  #15  
Old 02-11-17, 17:10
Stuart Fedak Stuart Fedak is offline
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Default Marker for Cpl Hedley M. Shaw

I was reviewing my photographs from visiting Holland in 2005 for the 60th anniversary of the liberation of Holland, and came across the marker for B 119502 Cpl. H.M. Shaw of the LSR(M), reported missing in action.

Stuart
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  #16  
Old 02-11-17, 18:42
Stuart Fedak Stuart Fedak is offline
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Default Pte. J. Brown and Pte. L. Dobberthien

I have attached some images of Pte J. Brown and Pte L Dobberthien who were injured in the 11-February 1945 raid of the Lake Superior Regiment (Motor) across the Maas River. Pte J. Brown was a life long friend of my father.

Stuart
Attached Thumbnails
Letters_to_Leah_Mike_Fedak_Pte_J_Brown.jpg   Letters_to_Leah_Mike_Fedak_Pte_Lorne_Dobberthien.jpg  
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