MLU FORUM  

Go Back   MLU FORUM > MILITARY VEHICLES > Post-war Military Vehicles

Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #91  
Old 15-06-20, 11:37
David Herbert David Herbert is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland - previously Suffolk
Posts: 413
Default

I like the rotisserie, a nice piece of innovation but it took me a moment to work out what the ladder and ridge pole was for.

It is amazing how a coat of paint cheers things up. Soon you will be building up a 'new' truck.

David
Reply With Quote
  #92  
Old 15-06-20, 16:08
Wayne Hingley's Avatar
Wayne Hingley Wayne Hingley is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Water Valley, Alberta
Posts: 616
Default

I was working under the threat of a rogue rain cloud coming by, so a plan for quick cover was necessary. Yes I agree, a bit of paint cheers things up, and gets me one step closer to another milestone.
Attached Thumbnails
BF21E20E-33AF-4FDC-AE6D-DA64C6C251C8.jpeg  
__________________
1953 M37 CDN
1953 M38A1 CDN
1967 M38A1 CDN2
Reply With Quote
  #93  
Old 15-06-20, 16:19
David Dunlop David Dunlop is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Winnipeg, MB
Posts: 2,338
Default

Great alternate use for a cargo tarp, Wayne! A little higher and you could get one heck of a family gathering dinner table under it!

David
Reply With Quote
  #94  
Old 15-06-20, 16:37
rob love rob love is offline
carrier mech
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Shilo MB, the armpit of Canada
Posts: 6,474
Default

Not a cargo tarp, but a center section of modular. They are perfect for this type of thing.....hard to find a better tarp for corded firewood.
Reply With Quote
  #95  
Old 18-06-20, 05:23
super dave super dave is offline
Dave Good
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Onoway, Alberta, Canada
Posts: 662
Default

So you are probably going to need this pretty soon at the pace you are going .
Attached Thumbnails
_DSC0115.jpg   _DSC0116.jpg  
Reply With Quote
  #96  
Old 18-06-20, 06:12
Wayne Hingley's Avatar
Wayne Hingley Wayne Hingley is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Water Valley, Alberta
Posts: 616
Default I think your right...

Yes, that will be a desirable addition. It looks great Dave! Just say when you want me to drop by...
__________________
1953 M37 CDN
1953 M38A1 CDN
1967 M38A1 CDN2
Reply With Quote
  #97  
Old 18-06-20, 06:54
Wayne Hingley's Avatar
Wayne Hingley Wayne Hingley is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Water Valley, Alberta
Posts: 616
Default

My outdoor painting has been stalled by rain for the past two days, but I did get one coat of green on when the sun was still shining. Maybe more tomorrow.
Attached Thumbnails
D0FEFF8A-D1FC-40C6-AC37-001724B35FB3.jpeg   D290FA10-FC98-4ADC-BD94-413A1E6F1F53.jpeg  
__________________
1953 M37 CDN
1953 M38A1 CDN
1967 M38A1 CDN2
Reply With Quote
  #98  
Old 18-06-20, 22:58
Lynn Eades's Avatar
Lynn Eades Lynn Eades is offline
Bluebell
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Tauranga, New Zealand
Posts: 5,022
Default

Dave, excuse my ignorance, but what does the filtery thingy between the oil gallery and the oil filler do? Pressure relief valve?

Looking great Wayne.
__________________
Bluebell

Carrier Armoured O.P. No1 Mk3 W. T84991
Carrier Bren No2.Mk.I. NewZealand Railways. NZR.6.
Dodge WC55. 37mm Gun Motor Carriage M6
Jeep Mb #135668
So many questions....
Reply With Quote
  #99  
Old 18-06-20, 23:51
Wayne Hingley's Avatar
Wayne Hingley Wayne Hingley is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Water Valley, Alberta
Posts: 616
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynn Eades View Post
Dave, excuse my ignorance, but what does the filtery thingy between the oil gallery and the oil filler do? Pressure relief valve?

Looking great Wayne.
Hi Lynn, I think its the angle of the photo that makes it look like the fittings are connected... but I think you are looking at the oil pressure sending unit (brass color). Its not connected to the filler spout, but it looks that way due to the angle of the photo.
__________________
1953 M37 CDN
1953 M38A1 CDN
1967 M38A1 CDN2
Reply With Quote
  #100  
Old 19-06-20, 04:36
Lynn Eades's Avatar
Lynn Eades Lynn Eades is offline
Bluebell
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Tauranga, New Zealand
Posts: 5,022
Default

Thanks Wayne. I was easily fooled by my eyes but what I saw made no sense. Cheers.
__________________
Bluebell

Carrier Armoured O.P. No1 Mk3 W. T84991
Carrier Bren No2.Mk.I. NewZealand Railways. NZR.6.
Dodge WC55. 37mm Gun Motor Carriage M6
Jeep Mb #135668
So many questions....
Reply With Quote
  #101  
Old 27-06-20, 19:06
Peter Phillips Peter Phillips is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Cold Lake, Alberta
Posts: 114
Default

That is coming along nicely Wayne! I have to admit I'm a bit puzzled on everyone's troubled experiences breaking down split rim tires? As a 5-ton driver in 1 & 2 Svc Bn, we had to break down 10.00 x 20.00 NDT's quite a lot with a only a tire sledge and spoon. We did use a cage for re-inflating. Probably the only safety related item I ever seen used in the military! Is it the corrosion that's stopping these from breaking down? I found a liberal amount of soapy water and a few well placed blows with the sledge would loosen the bead easily. And as murphy's law goes, it was always the inside duals that went flat usually from spent shell casing penetrations. Now this was back in 1986.........
__________________
Peter Phillips
1952 M38Cdn
1953 M100Cdn
1951 PE-95K Gen Set
MVPA
Cdn Forces 1986-2006
Reply With Quote
  #102  
Old 27-06-20, 19:53
Clint Tauber's Avatar
Clint Tauber Clint Tauber is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Masset, BC, Canada
Posts: 75
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Phillips View Post
That is coming along nicely Wayne! I have to admit I'm a bit puzzled on everyone's troubled experiences breaking down split rim tires? As a 5-ton driver in 1 & 2 Svc Bn, we had to break down 10.00 x 20.00 NDT's quite a lot with a only a tire sledge and spoon. We did use a cage for re-inflating. Probably the only safety related item I ever seen used in the military! Is it the corrosion that's stopping these from breaking down? I found a liberal amount of soapy water and a few well placed blows with the sledge would loosen the bead easily. And as murphy's law goes, it was always the inside duals that went flat usually from spent shell casing penetrations. Now this was back in 1986.........
They come apart easily, on trucks that see frequent use. Not so much after sitting in a field for years, with water accumulating inside the rim, slowly rusting away. They often have to be cut off the rims after a few decades.
Reply With Quote
  #103  
Old 28-06-20, 00:24
Phil Waterman's Avatar
Phil Waterman Phil Waterman is offline
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Temple, New Hampshire, USA
Posts: 3,822
Default You raise an interesting point

Hi Clint

You raise a couple of interesting points about tires and rims that have had a chance to sit and rust together.

I've dealt with CMPs tires that had sat for years but would hold air or in the case of run flats hold shape. When they are on a truck that is driveable then driving around on the tires at low or no air pressure seems to make easier to break the tire down. But as often happens you end up dealing with tires and rims from a non running truck that has had a real chance to rust together.

One of my trucks had a mix of run flats and regular military tires and was running and driveable so it got the let the air out and drive it around the circle a dozen times in both directions. On that one the regular tires came off with some serious tire iron work while the run flats had to be cut off with a sawsall. This problem is aggravated by the bead locks more area to get rusted together.

Now once the rims are clean and well painted and on a truck that is regularly driven it is not a big deal to break down tires. One particular trick I've learned is take your time get the tire laying flat at comfortable working height then take two 24 to 30 inch tire irons and stick the first irons in and lean on it while sticking the second iron in next it repeat over an over as you walk your way around the tire TWICE. It doesn't seem to be a matter of pushing real hard just let your weigh do the work. It seems that that trick is the TWICE around one my trucks even with tires that have been on for ten years they come apart at this point.

How I figure this trick out was watching a professional tire guy break set CMP tires off the rims. It was in a big truck tire shop and the young gorilla that was trying to break down the first tire and rim mounted up tire on the big power unit and started the machine at full power putting as much force as he could. The professional (boss) came over and said don't beat up the machine, just let the bead breaking wheel run around the tire a couple of times at medium pressure. Couple of times around an there was that satisfying clank as one half of the rim separated from tire. Turn the tire around and repeat. When the rim halves were out the boss laughed when he saw the solid rubber bead lock.

Cheers Phil
__________________
Phil Waterman
`41 C60L Pattern 12
`42 C60S Radio Pattern 13
`45 HUP
http://canadianmilitarypattern.com/
New e-mail Philip@canadianmilitarypattern.com
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
19 set restoration universalgrl The Wireless Forum 0 10-01-14 18:51
4.5 Restoration James Shopland The Gun Park 7 18-03-13 16:38
19 Set Restoration Bruce Parker The Wireless Forum 3 07-09-12 08:46
Cab 12 7A2 FAT for restoration Keith Webb The Softskin Forum 1 03-04-07 13:20
F8 for restoration david moore The Softskin Forum 32 21-06-05 14:47


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 03:06.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © Maple Leaf Up, 2003-2016