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  #1  
Old 09-04-12, 04:01
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Mike Kelly Mike Kelly is offline
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Default German radio collection

Radio equipment used by the other side

http://www.desyatnik.com/radio_coll.php
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  #2  
Old 17-05-12, 14:45
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Default german panther tank

Did anyone see the German radio gear on ebay australia a short time ago.
What a find! What a price! A complete set for a Panther tank.

http://cgi.ebay.com.au/ws/eBayISAPI....vip=true&rt=nc
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Old 03-06-12, 05:43
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Default Cipher machines

Hi Ryan , I read your post regarding the panther radio set up with interest and it has prompted me to ask do any of our radio members have any interest in cipher machines, Enigma etc? its a facinating subject, regards Ron
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Old 06-06-12, 11:15
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Default Swiss Nema cipher machine

Just a pic of a Swiss Nema cipher machine, it may be of some interest? I have more pics of it if anyone is interested? regards Ron
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  #5  
Old 06-05-13, 13:13
Chevrolet 41 Chevrolet 41 is offline
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Default WW11 Communications

Wearing two hats, that of vehicle owner and WW11 re-enactor, I've participated in events that combine the two to find the experience of uniformed soldiers, period camps and rifle fire with the correct WW11 vehicles to be a truly immersive time.

Taking it a step further is to combine WW11 communication equipment to command and control the vehicle and troops within the limitations this equipment had. Ie the German Torn Fu D2 had a very limited range of a few kilometres so the effective directing of troops was conducted within this range instead of mobile phone coverage of the globe!

Some groups have conducted Signal weekends but I'd love to see events that combine all elements of the war era (field kitchens too would be great) so people can get as close to the wartime history as possible.

Now obviously getting all this assembled in one place is nigh impossible particularly in Australia. So the question is, does anyone with this type of gear and inclination to see it used (appropritely/safely) in re-enactments, and live in Adelaide or close by want to create a lively scene?

Cheers
Chris
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  #6  
Old 07-05-13, 23:38
Chuck Anderson Chuck Anderson is offline
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Default Reenacting with radios

Hi Chris,

We've been using period radios at reenactments for a while now. The radios are either originals or replicas that have been VERY SLIGHTLY altered to work using a modern 12-mile FRS radio (the little walkie-talkies they sell in the sporting good stores). The vintage radios aren't gutted or severely altered because somewhere down the line there may be someone that wants to try to restore the unit to WWII function-ability.

Even though they supposedly have a 12 mile range, the reality is that the FRS'es tend to behave more like a real WWII radio. Distance and line-of-sight affect performance. The radio outputs are wired in to the vintage radio's microphone & headset jacks, so the controls on the vintage radio don't do anything. We're just using the vintage radio as a "front" for the FRS. It's fun because you're using period mics & headsets, but talking through the FRS. Here are a couple pictures of the German radios. I've wired up the No. 19 set in my Dingo to function this way also.

Chuck













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  #7  
Old 08-05-13, 06:59
Guy Guy is offline
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Default German WWII radios

Hi, just wondering how to get a valuation on German Radio equipment, I have several radios, I believe they were used in armoured vehicles. Thanks.
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  #8  
Old 12-05-13, 01:22
Chevrolet 41 Chevrolet 41 is offline
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Hello Chuck,

Now you've got the idea right there and in quantity

I appreciate the years of work behind those photos and thanks for sharing. Now, when are you moving to Australia?

How many helpers do you have to run the communications?

So far I've only assembled a few FF33 and cable, a Torn E.b and 10 line switchboard but I think this can be utilised well. For example the phones go out to forward positions and in camp back to the switchboard and the Torn E.b can be used as a listening post.

Guy,

to partially answer your question, I'd like to get a Fu D2 as Chuck has posted but the E.b frequency wont pick it up. One just sold on US Ebay for just under $2900 and didn't have the valves so more work and dollars to get her going.

Once I get my Signals station set up, I'll have to get a few pics to post.

All the Best
Chris
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  #9  
Old 13-05-13, 03:12
Chuck Anderson Chuck Anderson is offline
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Chris - Thank you for the compliments!

The trick to having a specialized impression at a reenactment (radio operator, military police, sapper, etc) is having at least 2 or 3 people that are really focused on that impression. If you try to press one of your riflemen into carrying a radio, or chaining him to a field phone if he isn't really into it, it won't be used properly and you won't realize your tactical potential. One time, we issued backpack radios to every unit so as to be able to communicate with the battalion CO so he could direct movement quickly. One of the unit commanders viewed the radio as an encumbrance, and left it sitting on the side of a road (incidentally, his unit became isolated from the rest of the battalion and rendered useless to the tactical situation).

From what I've seen, the tranceivers tend to command the higher prices. The Torn E.bs are very cool receivers, and if you have a CP set up with room for a seperate transmitter/receiver arrangement, you don't need a tranceiver. The backpack radios in the photos are post-war Russian copies of the German Torn Fu.g radios. The Fu.d2 in the photos is a replica built on a resin faceplate. The resin ones are nice because they're cheap and you don't have to alter an original radio. The downside is that the knobs don't turn.

BTW, I had bought the 15 W.S.E.b to put in the back of my replica kubel, but am having thoughts about selling it instead. It's already set up for the FRS and uses original headsets, mic, and key.
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  #10  
Old 13-05-13, 03:18
Chuck Anderson Chuck Anderson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Guy View Post
Hi, just wondering how to get a valuation on German Radio equipment, I have several radios, I believe they were used in armoured vehicles. Thanks.
Guy -

If you'll list which units you have, I can look them up in my reference book and tell you what application they had. It would also be a good first step to determining a current market value.
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  #11  
Old 26-05-13, 20:02
Guy Guy is offline
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Default German WWII radios

Hello, I have two radios and two field telephones, one phone has original german battery with ink eagle stamps on it.

Radios are both the same size; one is UkW.E.e dated 44 and the other is Mw.E.c

The UkW unit has the cover plate and the other radio does not.

Size 8 inches high and 12 inches across and almost 7 inches deep.

UkW paint is in good condition and the other one has many paint chips.

Any idea ? Thanks, Guy
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  #12  
Old 27-05-13, 08:31
Chuck Anderson Chuck Anderson is offline
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Hi Guy,

Both the Ukw.E.e and the Mw.E.c are receivers that were (usually) used in conjunction with a transmitter to make a vehicle based radio set. For example, two Ukw.E.e receivers were paired with a 20 W.S.c transmitter in some the Panzer IIIs. The Mw.E.c was used in SdKfz 250/6, SdKfz 251/3, SdKfz 251/10 as well as many others.

As far as values.......... the phones are the easiest since they're not very rare. The battery is somewhat rare though. I've seen German field phones go for $125 to $200 depending on condition and if they function. I'd ask more though for the one with the battery.

I haven't seen many of those receivers on the market so I don't really have a clear idea on the value. Last summer there was a Ukw.E.e on Ebay, it sold for $800 plus shipping from Easten Europe.

I have a friend that has an OT-810 that is being converted to a SdKfz 251/C and might be interested in the Mw.E.c. If you decide to sell it, please let me know and I'll pass it along.
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  #13  
Old 01-06-13, 18:02
Guy Guy is offline
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Default German Radios

Hello, thanks for your help figuring things out with my small collection of German radios, they are for sale if anyone is interested.
Thanks again, Guy
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