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  #421  
Old 08-11-20, 02:15
David Dunlop David Dunlop is offline
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Default COVERS, Metal, Blowers, Electric 3-11/16 inch dia. No. C1 ZA/CAN 4243

Good outdoor painting weather is rapidly disappearing here these days, so I took advantage of a chance to strip the old paint and varnish coats off this item yesterday and get it ready for priming.

I was surprised at how bright and shiny the original metal work was underneath the layers of paint.

Originally, the interior of these COVERS was left in a bare, plated metal state, but traces of overspray through the wire screens was still evident around the inner rim. Over the years, moisture had puddled on the lower inner rim and some surface rusting needed to be cleaned away. For the sake of protecting this inner surface in the future, I have decided to prime it, but only finish coat the exterior surfaces.

For such a small part, the extent to which it underwent spot welding it worth noting on the exterior view. You can see a lot of spot weld dimples all the way around the front rim. I am thinking a number of these welds were first applied to hold the wire screen securely in place. Then the inner C-Ring fitting was installed and also spot-welded in place, to prevent the open rim of the wire screen from moving about and perhaps unravelling.

If you browse back to Post 285, you will see what this COVERS looked like when first removed from the Sender panel.

David
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COVERS, Metal, Blowers, Electric 3.JPG   COVERS, Metal, Blowers, Electric 4.JPG  
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  #422  
Old 08-11-20, 20:14
David Dunlop David Dunlop is offline
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The COVERS, Metal for the Sender front panel has now been primed inside and out.

Hopefully the weather will hold long enough this week to get the finish coat applied to the outside of the COVERS now.

David
Attached Thumbnails
COVERS, Metal, Blowers, Electric 5.JPG   COVERS, Metal, Blowers, Electric 6.JPG  
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  #423  
Old 09-11-20, 18:09
David Dunlop David Dunlop is offline
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Default COVERS, Metal, Blowers, Electric 3-11/16 inch dia. No. C1 ZA/CAN 4243

The COVERS for the Sender, with its final exterior coat of paint.

Now to start working on the last major repair challenge before reassembly of the front panel to the Sender can begin.

David
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COVERS, Metal, Blowers, Electric 7.JPG  
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  #424  
Old 09-11-20, 19:27
David Dunlop David Dunlop is offline
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Default Wartime Varnishes

While waiting for paint to dry, and taking advantage of the last really nice warm weather here last weekend, I spent some time in the back garden reading up on vintage varnishes. I was frankly amazed at the amount of information that is available, and it is constantly being added to by research teams around the world involved in art, musical instrument and furniture restoration and preservation work.

In simplistic terms, a varnish consists of a solvent medium and resins dissolved therein, with or without the addition of lesser organic ingredients that influence the drying time, finish gloss or hardness/flexibility of the finished product. All vintage varnishes will colour, or darken, naturally over time and some compounds can be added to the mix to produce particular shades of yellow or orange with the initial application. Artists like Monet and Van Gogh, were aware of the natural darkening of varnishes and typically painted in lighter tones of paint to allow for the varnish darkening in the finished painting.

The three common solvents were linseed oil, tang oil and walnut oil, and if a faster drying time was needed, turpentine was used. The vast majority of resins came from conifer trees, pines and firs.

Where it got interesting was the locations for the most popular resin supplies - Malaysia, Indonesia and several of the smaller Greek Islands. It was also noted that the Canada Balsam Fir could also provide a good resin for varnish, but it had a tendency to darken rather quickly.

So it looks like, if the timeline for the fall of the above noted sources of resins during the early part of the war was compared to wartime wireless production, one would expect more late war wireless equipment to have varnishes made from the readily available Canada Balsam Fir, and these would yellow up, or darken, much more noticeably than the earlier war production items.

David
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  #425  
Old 10-11-20, 22:57
David Dunlop David Dunlop is offline
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Default COUNTERS, 0/9999 2-3/4 inch x 1-3/8 inch x 1-7/8 inch, No. C1 ZA/CAN 4642

This is the first step that I have thought my way through in regards to being able to reset the four digit indicator for the 7 – 16 MC PA TUNING, COUNTERS.

I need to know the centre point of the indicator dial when it is mounted to the front panel of the Sender, without the front panel being installed, as it is impossible to work on these COUNTERS with the front panel in place. So I need to create a temporary set of x-axis and y-axis reference points.

I did this by first setting up small strips of masking tape on the top and sides of the chassis, where the requited axes would be located. I then reattached the front panel to the chassis with the two upper corner screws and marked the relevant axes marks with an adjustable square, on the side tapes. When the front panel was removed once more, the location marks on the sides were transferred to the tape strips on the front of the chassis.

In the second photo, you can see the two COUNTERS temporarily blocked in their correct positions. Note that although the 1.75 – 8 MC PA TUNING indicator (on the left in this orientation) reads a correct ‘0000’, the 8 – 16 MC PA TUNING indicator on the right has the lowest digit stuck at ‘3/4’. In this position, the Tuning Coil and its related flexible coupling attached to the COUNTERS, are all correctly oriented, as is the COUNTERS itself. What I have to sort out is the best means of keeping the COUNTERS in that position while disconnecting the two sections of the gear drive on it from each other. If I can do that, then I can reset the indicator dial to ‘0000’ and carefully reconnect the two sections of gears, thereby locking the dial back into its correct reading when in its correct final position for reattaching to the front panel.

More on this as I sort it out.

David
Attached Thumbnails
WS No. 52 Sender 53.JPG   WS No. 52 Sender 54.JPG  
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  #426  
Old 11-11-20, 08:25
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Mike Kelly Mike Kelly is offline
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Default Nice

I guess you have seen this guys work

http://www.radiomuseum.co.uk/ws52.html
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  #427  
Old 11-11-20, 17:16
David Dunlop David Dunlop is offline
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Hello Mike.

Thanks for posting that link. Although I was aware of his restoration work via another website, I was unaware he had done any 52-Set work.

There is some excellent information work there, as I am just at the calibration and alignment point with both of my receivers, and as he noted, accessible chassis space dictated a few innovative (read remoter than usual) locations for component boards, with significant cable runs and conduits to tie everything together. I had made a note to myself to start mapping out the component locations ahead of time but noticed that work has been well done already now. That will be a huge time saver!

Thanks again and stay safe, Mike.

David
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  #428  
Old 11-11-20, 21:31
David Dunlop David Dunlop is offline
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Default BLOWERS, Electric, 4-Blade, No. C1 ZA/CAN 4411

While mulling over the challenges of the COUNTERS reset, I decided to pull the Sender BLOWERS out of storage and have a closer look at the assembly.

A good layer of greasy soot over the front of it all, but the backside was rather clean. Same for the fan blades. VERY filthy on the front side with a few rusty patched showing dull red through the crud, but an interesting amount of shiny metal showing through on the back side of the blades.

Curiosity got the better of me and I decided to clean it all up to better see what was going on.

These three photos are before the cleanup.

David
Attached Thumbnails
WS No. 52 BLOWERS, Electric 6.JPG   WS No. 52 BLOWERS, Electric 7.JPG   WS No. 52 BLOWERS, Electric 8.JPG  
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  #429  
Old 11-11-20, 21:39
David Dunlop David Dunlop is offline
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Default BLOWERS, Electric, 4-Blade, No. C1 ZA/CAN 4411

A couple of hours later, after several solvent rinses, and a light buffing of the rusty sections, this is what came out from under the crud.

I am a bit surprised to find the fan blade has such a bright finish, but now recall seeing a photo of a 52-Set in service somewhere and the fan blades were very visible on both blowers, through the mesh screen COVERS. I must try and find that photo again, and it will be interesting to see what is going on with the Supply Unit BLOWERS when I get around to that part of the project.

David
Attached Thumbnails
WS No. 52 BLOWERS, Electric 9.JPG   WS No. 52 BLOWERS, Electric 10.JPG   WS No. 52 BLOWERS, Electric 11.JPG  
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  #430  
Old 11-11-20, 22:54
Grant Bowker Grant Bowker is offline
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I think having 1 side of the blades more dirty makes sense. The side pushing the air would also strike any suspended oils, filth or cigarette smoke and the particles stick to the blades. And then the already stuck on particles would collect other, dry particles. I would expect the same on the motor and screens - upstream side dirty, downstream side cleaner.
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  #431  
Old 22-11-20, 00:30
David Dunlop David Dunlop is offline
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Hi Grant.

Yes, It will be interesting to compare it to the one in the Supply Unit when I get to it.

David
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  #432  
Old 22-11-20, 00:31
David Dunlop David Dunlop is offline
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It has been an interesting last three days.

On Thursday, I finally decided to tackle resetting the 7 – 16 MC PA TUNING DIAL to ‘0000’. What I discovered was that if you backed off the four small screws holding the dial assembly to the rest of the Counter Frame, the two gears would separate. You only have to back the screws off until the ends of them are flush with the back of their hex nuts to accomplish this, fortunately. What is extremely important here is that the coil in question MUST be at its Zero Stop, along with its associated Flexible Coupling on the Counter Gear assembly, and the Indicator Dial must be in its final mounting position relative to the front panel. Hence my masking tape marker project earlier.

It all sounds a little tricky, and it is. It took me 8 attempts to do it. On seven of them, the two parts of the flexible coupling kept moving out of alignment with one another, which changes the entire geometry of the assembly. After the seventh attempt, I realized a simple piece of masking tape over the flexible coupling while in its proper resting orientation, would hold the pieces stable until the reset was completed.

With the tape in place and the two gears separated from each other, I could use a small screw driver to carefully move the dial gear back to get the dial at ‘0000’, and then retighten the four screws to pull the gears back together. Things looked pretty good. The dial was in the correct position, resting on a small wood block with all zero’s showing. And then the wooden block fell away and I heard the dreaded sound of the SPRING, Coupling Retaining flying off to Never land.

Hoping the spring was on the work desk somewhere, I picked up the Sender and turning it to one side to check underneath it. I did this too aggressively. The other Counter Assembly swung to one side and I heard its spring go for a trip and land somewhere to the left of the desk about six feet away. That one I found after about five minutes of searching down low on a black rubber mat with a flashlight. I did not find the other spring until Friday evening after a forensic cleaning of the desktop and a search of the floor 5 timed with a work light held close to the floor. I used a different angle with the light each time and on the 6th attempt spotted the errant spring on the carpet, basically where I had been standing the day before.
It took most of this morning to figure out the best way to reinstall the two retaining springs, but once reinstalled, I wasted no time in getting the front panel of the Sender reattached. All missing, broken and incorrect hardware has been replaced. The Sockets, Aerials has been remounted to the front panel with just the one screw that fits the front panel only. It is difficult to get to once the panel is on the chassis. The other two screws pass through the front panel and the chassis frame and will be reinstalled once I locate correct external tooth lock washers for them.

All chassis hardware has now been reinstalled. The only remaining ones to go are the upper adjustment screw for the Flick Stops for each dial.

David
Attached Thumbnails
WS No. 52 Sender 55.JPG   WS No. 52 Sender 56.JPG  
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  #433  
Old 22-11-20, 00:42
David Dunlop David Dunlop is offline
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Default KNOBS, Metal, 10-32 thd No. C1 ZA/CAN 4597

The first of the restored parts have now been remounted on the Sender front panel.The two KNOBS, Metal used to pull the Sender out of the Carriers No. 4, and stuff it back in.

David
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WS No. 52 Sender 57.JPG  
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  #434  
Old 22-11-20, 05:11
David Dunlop David Dunlop is offline
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The Bakelite KEY and MIC Guards and hardware are now cleaned and reinstalled. I just have to lacquer the screw ends inside the chassis once everything else still flopping about has been reattached.

David
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WS No. 52 Sender 58.JPG  
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  #435  
Old 22-11-20, 20:57
David Dunlop David Dunlop is offline
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A simple bit of work today.

I have cleaned and reinstalled the lock washer and hex nut sets to the METER SENS Switch, MODE OF OPERATION Switch and the METER SWITCH, along the lower right section of the Sender.

This secures the last wobbly bits in the Sender, finally.

The next step will be working on what still needs to be addressed with the Blower Access Door and getting it, and its related components reinstalled.

David
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WS No. 52 Sender 59.JPG  
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  #436  
Old 23-11-20, 22:41
David Dunlop David Dunlop is offline
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Default DOORS, Metal, Hinged ZA/CAN 4294

On the bright side this morning, I did get some important work done on the DOORS assembly for the Sender. I was able to remove the two broken and bent Cross Pins from the two Cowl Fasteners on the door.

Gripping the longer ends of each existing pin with a small set of vise grips, I was able to give them both a slight twist and steady pull, and out they both came.

Installing the new pins went just like the instructions said they would with the Cross Pin Installation Tool. You can press one end of the new pin into the stud hole with your thumb and finger right up the the start of the central locking ridges on the pin. then you have to use the Installation Tool. It takes several attempts to get the first pin properly centred, making small adjustments to the tool each time. Once that first pin is centred on the stud, you lock in that setting on the tool. The second pin went in centred with the tool on the first use.

Nice to get those two fasteners fixed. You can see the new pins in the studs in the photo, along with the remains of the damaged pins.

That was as far as I got with work on the Sender DOORS today.the reason will be revealed shortly in my next Post.

David
Attached Thumbnails
WS No. 52 Sender Doors 9.JPG  

Last edited by David Dunlop; 24-11-20 at 03:40.
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  #437  
Old 24-11-20, 00:01
David Dunlop David Dunlop is offline
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Default PLATES, Phenolic, Calibration ZA/CAN 4361

So! Let’s back up a moment to Post 435 and take a look at the area on the Sender front panel, directly above the PA LOADINGS decal between the two Counter Dials. Notice the empty pair of vertical holes? I did not, until last evening, and I was not impressed. Calm, but not impressed.

That is where the PLATES, Phenolic, Calibration goes. Mounted directly to the Sender front panel, and it is highly recommended this be done well before securing the front panel back onto the Sender chassis. The reason being, the two Dial Assemblies either side of the PLATES, Phenolic, Calibration, effectively block about 85 % of the access to the PLATES hardware location. There is no access at all from above or below. Silly me!

The bright side of all this was that after about 10 minutes of looking things over, I discovered it was possible to get my left hand in the Blower Door Access Hole, slide it in far enough to allow my left index and middle finger to carefully clear any contact with the left side Counters assembly and get the middle finger to reach both mounting holes for the PLATES, Phenolic, Calibration. The real trick, however, was going to be how to get each pair of lock washers and hex nuts over there to connect with their respective screws coming down through the Sender front panel, without all the bits getting scattered all over the place. I have had enough of that adventure for a while.

The first step of the solution I came up with was to take a couple of small drops of clear nail polish and glue the two lock washers to their respective hex nuts, being certain to keep the washers centred over the holes in the hex nuts and to keep any, and all, nail polish out of the threads in the nuts. Got that done successfully and they are now curing.

The second step, when I am ready to do the PLATES install, will be to glue the bottom of the hex nut to the tip of my middle finger with a drop of red nail polish and let it cure. Which will take about 15 minutes. The theory is the hardware set will stay put until the middle finger successfully avoids hitting anything and gets the hardware to the correct hole for the screw to be dropped into place and secured. Once the screw threads have engaged the hex nut to capture it, finger pressure will hold the nut in place until the lock washer starts to engage the back of the front panel, and I can let the hex nut twist free of my finger.

Having got all that sorted out, I then realized why I had not had the PLATES, Phenolic, Calibration all ready and waiting for reinstallation prior to remounting the Sender front panel to the chassis. This particular PLATES had a very bad bend in it. So bad, one could easily slide a new, closed manila file folder under the left edge of it and still have room to spare.

Earlier, I had thought I would simply replace the Sender PLATES with the one off my parts COILS, Aerial Tuning, only to discover it too had a curl to it, and the PLATES for the COILS were made by a different manufacturer than the ones used on the Sender. That had left me with the problem of whether or not it was possible to straighten out my curled PLATES to salvage it.

Some exploring on the Internet eventually revealed that people out there restoring vintage pinball machines from the 1930’s and 1940’s were faced with the same problem on their machines. Everything that lights up on these old games is hand painted artwork on plastic. A huge problem with these machines was the tendency of arcade owners to over lamp their machines to draw people to the newest games. The hotter bulbs took their toll on the plastic covers, frequently warping them.

The solution to this problem was to remove the warped plastic covers from the machines, lay them face down on a metal cookie sheet and place them in the oven at about 400 degrees F, leave the oven door open and sit and watch the plastic pieces until they slowly flatten out. This apparently takes about 10 to 15 minutes when the oven temp hits the 250-degree range. You then quickly remove the cookie sheet, put it on the counter and cover the plastic bits with something metal and heavy and let them cool for about 10 minutes. And they are flat.

I went a modified approach. I placed a sheet of parchment paper on the cookie sheet on the counter. Then put the PLATES, Phenolic, Calibration face down on the paper. Then I took a clear glass Pyrex baking dish with a smooth flat bottom and set it over the PLATES so I could watch it. Then I used a heat gun set on ‘High’, (about 500 F) and moved it back and forth over the dish while watching the PLATES. The weight of the dish flattens the PLATES for the most part, but I could still see the stress line at the worst part of the curve, so watched it. After 10 to 12 minutes, I could see the stress line disappear. I had oven mitts ready, so shut the heat gun off and carefully set it aside, relying on the retained heat of the baking dish to keep the PLATES flat. I had a small sheet of metal on standby with a small hydraulic jack. Removing the dish with my oven mitted left hand, I swung the metal sheet in behind it with my right hand and placed it on the plates, along with the jack. At this point, both the cookie sheet and the sheet metal and jack are acting as heat sinks. After 20 minutes, I removed the sheet metal and jack and removed the PLATES for inspection. Nice and flat with no damage.

The attached pictures show the before and after heating set up, and the edge on views are the Sender PLATES first, with the COILS PLATES next. You can see the amount of light getting under each. The Sender PLATES was originally twice as curled at the COILS one is in the photo.

I shall see if I am up to reinstalling the PLATES on the Sender tomorrow.

David
Attached Thumbnails
PLATES, Phenolic, Calibration 6.JPG   PLATES, Phenolic, Calibration 2.JPG   PLATES, Phenolic, Calibration 3.JPG   PLATES, Phenolic, Calibration 4.JPG   PLATES, Phenolic, Calibration 5.JPG  


Last edited by David Dunlop; 24-11-20 at 03:45.
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  #438  
Old 24-11-20, 00:59
Bruce Parker Bruce Parker is offline
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Interesting and clever solutions to problems, always great to see how you resolve them.

There are various times kitchen utensils and appliances are very helpful in restoring or testing radio and truck parts. Boiling temperature gauge sending units in a pot on the stove, baking gas fouled spark plugs under the broiler, using the kitchen sink as a mild detergent wash basin. Of course if the wife catches you (which is almost all the time) you're done for. Fair being fair, when caught I always offer that she can do whatever kitchen chores she wants in the garage. And THAT'S when you duck the incoming frying pan.
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  #439  
Old Yesterday, 01:34
David Dunlop David Dunlop is offline
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I usually try and use all the borrowed items in the Laundry Room, Bruce, but the results are the same as yours.

Debbie really likes the aluminium fry pans. She's perfected a mean underhand hook with hers!

David
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  #440  
Old Yesterday, 01:37
David Dunlop David Dunlop is offline
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Default PLATES, Phenolic, Calibration ZA/CAN 4361

Well, the plan for reinstalling the PLATES, Phenolic, Calibration on the Sender front panel was a spectacular success this afternoon. It took an hour to complete, but that was only because I chose to wait a full 30 minutes for the nail polish to dry properly, gluing each hardware set to my middle finger. I have not watched so much daytime television in years!

David
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PLATES, Phenolic, Calibration 7.JPG  
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  #441  
Old Yesterday, 02:00
David Dunlop David Dunlop is offline
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Default DOORS, Metal, Hinged ZA/CAN 4294

I got back to working on the DOORS assembly on the Sender today as well. Turned out my procedure for the PLATES, Phenolic, Calibration hardware came in handy with reinstalling the DOORS also.

My plan for all the hardware was to stuff enough paper towel into my ¼-inch Quarter Drive socket to get the hex nuts sitting just flush with the end of the drive socket, rest the lock washer on top and with a slotted screw driver already securing the screw from the top, move the socket with the hardware in by my fingers to engage the end of the screw. Then run the screw home. It worked perfectly for the inner three sets of hardware. I had forgotten, however, that the two outermost sets of hardware are in much closer confines and this approach would not work for them. So I went back to the finger-gluing plan with my left index finger this time.

Problem solved with the reinstallation.

An interesting discovery surfaced, however.

The lower Cowl fastener on the door had a broken Cross Pin in it and did not fully engage the receptacle mounted on the side chassis. It now locks home in a quarter turn just nicely. This fastener is the replacement Dot made cowl fastener that was installed on the Door at some point in the Sender’s history.

The Cross Pin on the upper cowl fastener was the correct length, but offset to one end and this longer end bent down a bit, away from the door. With the new Cross Pin in place, I discovered why the upper Cross Pin was the way it was.

The upper Cowl Fastener, appears to be too short a length: about the thickness of the cross pin from what I can tell. Instead of engaging the groove between the two receptacle spring plates, it is riding along the upper, outer, spring plate. Whenever this Cowl Fastener was installed, it must have been an ‘available’ replacement and the new cross pin was bent deliberately to make it work. I am going to leave it as is, for the time being. I have not found enough information to date to fully understand how the sizing codes for the Shakeproof Wing Head Cowl Fasteners work to know what exactly is needed.

David
Attached Thumbnails
WS No. 52 Sender Doors 10.JPG  

Last edited by David Dunlop; Yesterday at 04:11.
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  #442  
Old Yesterday, 20:05
David Dunlop David Dunlop is offline
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Default TERMINALS, Aerial, No. C1 ZA/CAN 4716

The TERMINALS, Aerial, No. C1 was remounted to its new phenolic board this morning and the terminal feed wire reconnected to it.

As with the Remote receiver some time back, I took the time to mark the terminal feed hole with a toothpick and aligned it corrected with the location of the Eye Bolt the Receiver Feeder Cable passes through, just before connecting with this TERMINALS. The Feeder Cable is an exact length and in accordance with the factory photos in the 52-Set Manuals, comes off this Eye Bolt and runs straight into the Sender Terminals.

I found my ¼-Drive Ratchet with a medium slotted screw driver head wound just fit carefully behind the front panel to run the TERMINALS screw home with one hand, while keeping the TERMINALS correctly aligned with the other hand.

Not only is this part now solidly remounted to the Sender for the first time in however long, but also one of three electrical feeds I had to undo to remove the front panel, is now restored.

David
Attached Thumbnails
TERMINALS, Aerial, No. C1 ZA:CAN 4716 l.JPG   WS No. 52 Sender 60.JPG  
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  #443  
Old Yesterday, 22:59
David Dunlop David Dunlop is offline
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Another good afternoon’s work today.

The two Screw-Eyes above the Access Door Assembly were cleaned and reinstalled. The room to access the hex nuts inside the upper chassis frame is limited, so best to put these items back while the Blower Motor is off the Door. One can simply slide the hex nut up the inside of the upper chassis frame with a finger until it is centred in the hole and then screw insert the Screw-Eye.

I did not run the hex nuts all the way home on these two Screw-Eyes. They were both able to move freely in their holes in the front panel initially and it made sense to allow them to do that as they can shift with any bending of the Connector Cable they support between the Receiver and Sender. The inside diameters of both of these Screw-Eyes were perfect and I want to keep them that way. By comparison, somebody over tightened the Screw-Eye on the Supply Unit to the point the open end of the eye closed up on the loop enough you can no longer thread the Connector cable through it. One of the things to address when I get to the Supply Unit.

Once the Screw-Eyes were out of the way, I reinstalled the Blower Assembly and lacquered down the hardware. The power feed has not yet been resoldered in place. That will be the next bit of work.

Lastly, I reinstalled the restored COVERS, Metal, Blowers, Electric with the cable clip holding the Power Feed Cable to the door once again, and then lacquered that hardware.

It is nice when things can start to go back on a project.

David
Attached Thumbnails
WS No. 52 Sender 61.JPG   WS No. 52 Sender 62.JPG   WS No. 52 Sender 63.JPG  
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  #444  
Old Today, 04:14
David Dunlop David Dunlop is offline
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Default BLOWERS, Electric, 4-Blade, No. C1 ZA/CAN 4411

I decided to finish off the reinstallation of the BLOWERS Assembly this evening by resoldering it back into the Sender wiring harness.

Once that was done, top left rear corner of the rear panel board behind the motor housing, I applied a dab of red marker to the solder point, to bring it back to spec.

David
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WS No. 52 BLOWERS, Electric 12.JPG  
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