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  #181  
Old 05-08-20, 00:52
Jacques Reed Jacques Reed is offline
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Default Thank you Mariano

Quote:
Originally Posted by m606paz View Post
I'm glad that the manual I shared with you is very helpful!
If anyone has the Late Ford Fat Drivers Manual to share, I will be very grateful. Due to the economic crisis that my country is going through, at this time purchases abroad are prohibited. My Paypal account is blocked and I could not pay a penny for a manual or spare part.

Thanks in advance!
Hi Mariano,

Just want to thank you personally too. As Keith and Hanno said it is amazing the power of the internet. Who would have thought of the route the information would have to travel to get to me in Australia.
Sorry to hear your country is going through such tough economic times and the restrictions it places on you. I live in hope that in the not too distant future things will return to normal in the world.

All the best,
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  #182  
Old 13-08-20, 03:32
Jacques Reed Jacques Reed is offline
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Default Ford CMP speedometer cable- info

Good Day,

Just finished shortening the speedometer cable for my F-15A.
I am reasonably happy with the results and learnt a lot along the way.

Things to consider if you get one made up:

What type of tang tip is used at the transfer case end? With or without a shoulder?
Without a shoulder the tip goes 8 mm further into the driven gear and, if not allowed for, will result in 8 mm less engagement at the speedometer end. As I used a tip without a shoulder, the ferrule to tip distance was 24mm, but if I had used a shouldered tip the distance would have been 16 mm.
I did, however, allow 2 mm end clearance on the shaft at the speedometer drive to prevent the shaft end pressing on it and causing drag.

I found out that on the small transfer case ferrule on a 0.25" casing the shouldered tip could rub at the top of the ferrule so I am guessing the shouldered type was used on the larger 0.45" casing with the larger ferrule.

Note: Since posting this, I noticed the tip was contacting the casing- and not the ferrule, so on that basis after I removed the broken casing it looks OK to use a tip with a shoulder on the small transfer case ferrules as long as the casing is not inserted all the way into it. About where I put the mark would still allow for clearance and adequate grip on the casing.

Besides the speedometer end nuts being different between a Ford Commercial and a round Military Style speedometer, the ferrules are also different.
A Ford has a thinner flange, about 0.5mm, whereas a round gauge has a thicker one, 2 mm. This was apparent when I screwed the nut all the way home on the Ford ferrule that I used and it was still loose on the gauge. I cut off the flange from the round gauge ferrule, as I could not remove it anyway, and used it as a spacer.

The distance the shaft extends past the ferrule at the speedometer is also different. 15 mm for a round gauge and 8 mm for a Ford.

I used JB Weld to attach the tang tip. I didn't want to try to re-stake it and possibly have it way off centre or split the tip. Will see how it works out. I set it up in Vee blocks to keep it concentric with the shaft while the epoxy set. It seems a strong bond but I don't want to over stress it testing it. If it doesn't work out at least I have enough good info to get one made up.

Hope this is of some interest.
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IMG_0152.JPG   IMG_0176.JPG   IMG_0187.JPG  
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Last edited by Jacques Reed; 16-08-20 at 01:29. Reason: grammar. Corrected small ferrule notes
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  #183  
Old 26-08-20, 01:47
Jacques Reed Jacques Reed is offline
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Default Ford F-15A- Handbrake sector spacer

Good Day,

While sorting out the speedometer cable length and route I thought it would be a good time to sort out the handbrake lever bracket.

The parts manual shows washers *C351399S, 0.40" ID x 0.18 thick between the sector and the transmission bracket. I discovered a long time back that these washers move the arm further outboard, and in doing so moves the handbrake rod away from the transmission crossmember where it passes through it.

I used a pack of about 4 washers at each bolt to achieve this but it was a right pain to get everything lined up and not drop any of them on the deck.

So instead, I just made a spacer out of 1/4" flat bar as shown. It is a lot easier to handle and gives better support to the sector. Sometime you just have to deviate from original to make things work better.

As a matter of interest I've had three of these handbrake assemblies and all three were missing the spacer washers. Just shows some of the many small bits that goes missing over the years.

Cheers,
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hand brake .jpg   IMG_0216.JPG  
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  #184  
Old 27-08-20, 02:58
Jacques Reed Jacques Reed is offline
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Default F-15A Foam extinguisher bracket repair

Good Day,

Decided to do something about a part I have been tripping over in the shed for the past year.

I noticed the extinguisher bracket had been bent at some stage from a hit to the left side of it. The extinguisher was contacting the left side of the bracket but clear on the right. Despite having a 12 ton shop press I could find no way to access the bracket to press it straight so I resorted to threaded rod again.

As per photo, I was able to push the left side back into alignment and improve the curvature of the rear support.

Now I just have to wait until I can travel a reasonable distance again to fabricate the retaining band and latch mechanism. The nearest steel merchant is 10 km away but we are restricted to only essential travel within a 5 km radius.

A fellow MLU member sent me photos months ago of an original retaining band with some measurements, Thanks David. I have been drawing it up the last couple of days. Looks fairly straightforward, although the latch mechanism is a steel pressing which will have to be replicated without using a complex die.

Of interest is the way the anti-chafe material is secured to the back of the bracket. It looks like brass brake lining type rivets were used. I am wondering what material was used to prevent it chafing?

I thought maybe 3" fire hose was used. That has been used for years on everything from boat trailers to delivery trucks for that purpose. The band is 3" wide too so it would fit nicely and the rivet heads could be applied from the inside of the hose to prevent metal to metal contact with the extinguisher. Just a thought anyway, and may do that in lieu of any other information forthcoming.

Hope this is of some interest.

Cheers,
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  #185  
Old 28-10-20, 05:20
Jacques Reed Jacques Reed is offline
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Default Ford CMP Engine Transmission Data plates

Good Day,

Working on another project which I wanted to do for a long time. Covid lockdown hasn't been bad for everything.

I have done the artwork for Ford F15, F15-A and F60 Engine and Transmission data plates. See attached.

I used a very good F15-A plate that I scanned at 1200 DPI then digitally cleaned up and redid the graphics and lettering. I then used photos of the F15 and F60 model plates and modified the Auxiliary Transmission section and the quantities sections for those variants.

I looked into ways to reproduce them and the costs vary from astronomical to reasonable. They were probably done originally with a photo anodizing system similar to Metalphoto but that wasn't invented until 1950. That method is very good but cost prohibitive. Each tag would cost over $100 to produce in small runs.
I found a laser engraving business here in Australia that engraves black anodized aluminium plate with a laser at 600 dpi. That should ensure very good definition of the letters and graphics. In effect it is the opposite of the WW2 method but almost the same results. The black anodizing stays behind for the graphics and letters and the aluminium is exposed with the laser.

Presently I am awaiting to receive a prototype to analyse it before offering them for sale. If I go ahead with it the first run will be for the larger CMP's with 2 speed transfer cases as they seem to be most plentiful. Following that if enough interest shown I will get the F15 and F15-A plates made followed by the other instruction tags for the engine cover.

Stay tuned...

Cheers
Attached Thumbnails
F15-A.jpg   shift plate F15A art.jpg   Ff60 plate.jpg   shift plate-F60 art.jpg  
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  #186  
Old 28-10-20, 14:20
m606paz m606paz is offline
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Good Job!!
If you need a late F60 plate pics, tell me!
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  #187  
Old 28-10-20, 15:29
Grant Bowker Grant Bowker is offline
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A link to creating etched brass plates. https://www.instructables.com/Etching-brass-plates/
There used to be a similar set of instructions on stovebolt.com but I can't find them today.....
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  #188  
Old 28-10-20, 23:58
Jacques Reed Jacques Reed is offline
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Default Etching brass data plates

Hi Grant,

Thank you for that link. Brass may be an option if aluminium laser etching isn't satisfactory. Would like to keep it the same metal as original-aluminium.
Seems Chevy CMP's opted for brass plates or am I wrong?

That article would be very handy for someone restoring the early war Ford CMP's brass switch plates. I had one which I sold and think there was some black colour remaining in the graphics. See attached. Perhaps the whole plate was black but removing the green patina may have also remove the black.

Cheers,
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Last edited by Jacques Reed; 29-10-20 at 00:07. Reason: added photo
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  #189  
Old 29-10-20, 08:03
Jacques Reed Jacques Reed is offline
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Default Ford CMP late F60 Engine/Trans data plate

Quote:
Originally Posted by m606paz View Post
Good Job!!
If you need a late F60 plate pics, tell me!
Hi Mariano,

That would be great!

I just discovered an anomaly. Capacity of the two speed transfer case is 5 pts at the low plug and 7 pints at the high plug. From Special Pattern Vehicles booklet. See attached.

Zooming in on the F60 photo I can see where the transfer case capacity was stamped with a "2+" in front of the 5.
A modification obviously to show the high fill plug capacity.

Does yours show just the 7 pt. capacity?

Cheers
Attached Thumbnails
IMG_0983b.jpg   IMG_0133 3.JPG  
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Last edited by Jacques Reed; 30-10-20 at 01:04. Reason: Added capacity table photo
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  #190  
Old 03-11-20, 14:31
m606paz m606paz is offline
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Hi Jacques
This is the plate found attach on F60 LAAT
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001.jpg  
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  #191  
Old 03-11-20, 14:35
m606paz m606paz is offline
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And for the Fuel Tank Capacity(42 Gal), seem to be for the FAT.

Why the IMP erial MEASURE words... for Export??
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  #192  
Old 03-11-20, 14:49
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Tony Smith Tony Smith is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by m606paz View Post
And for the Fuel Tank Capacity(42 Gal), seem to be for the FAT.

Why the IMP erial MEASURE words... for Export??
Imperial Pints and Gallons are different (more volume) than US Pints and Gallons. In Canada, where there is a possibility of confusion with US measures, the standard used needs to be stated.
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  #193  
Old 03-11-20, 15:15
Bruce Parker Bruce Parker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques Reed View Post
Hi Grant,

Thank you for that link. Brass may be an option if aluminium laser etching isn't satisfactory. Would like to keep it the same metal as original-aluminium.
Seems Chevy CMP's opted for brass plates or am I wrong?

That article would be very handy for someone restoring the early war Ford CMP's brass switch plates. I had one which I sold and think there was some black colour remaining in the graphics. See attached. Perhaps the whole plate was black but removing the green patina may have also remove the black.

Cheers,
I have never seen a brass plate on a Chev. They were all steel with the decals (except Chevs with square instruments where no plate was used). I've only seen the brass plates on early 13 cab Fords. This speaks to factory and Canadian/British CMPs, no idea what the Australians may have gotten up to.
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  #194  
Old 03-11-20, 22:49
Jacques Reed Jacques Reed is offline
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Default Chev shift plates-brass

Hi Bruce,

Looking at the LWD website I saw a couple early C8, C15 brass shift plates.

I also see the black print on steel shift plates for the later Chev's so I guess most were of this type.

My understanding is that all Ford Australia assembled CMP's came to Australia as bare cab chassis with just the cowl, controls, and instrument panels. Doors, roof, and cabin parts were stamped here and added. I think even the floorboards were locally sourced. Perhaps to keep the shipping weight down?

I had two sets of brass switch plates from Australian assembled cab 13 trucks so I assume they came in with the cab chassis and not added later.

Cheers,
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  #195  
Old 03-11-20, 23:39
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Tony Smith Tony Smith is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce Parker View Post
I have never seen a brass plate on a Chev. They were all steel with the decals (except Chevs with square instruments where no plate was used). I've only seen the brass plates on early 13 cab Fords. This speaks to factory and Canadian/British CMPs, no idea what the Australians may have gotten up to.
12 Cab Chev:
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  #196  
Old 03-11-20, 23:57
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Default Completely Knocked Down

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques Reed View Post
My understanding is that all Ford Australia assembled CMP's came to Australia as bare cab chassis with just the cowl, controls, and instrument panels. Doors, roof, and cabin parts were stamped here and added. I think even the floorboards were locally sourced. Perhaps to keep the shipping weight down?

I had two sets of brass switch plates from Australian assembled cab 13 trucks so I assume they came in with the cab chassis and not added later.
Jacques, the Ford and Chevrolet CMP truck were shipped CKD - see this link and the description quoted below.

It means that the trucks were not assembled before being crated and shipped, but that crates with parts were shipped over, to be assembled in Australia with locally sourced parts - this may well have included switch plates.

Mike Cecil listed the difference in CKD content from Ford and Chevrolet on the old forum:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hanno Spoelstra View Post
This is endorsed by the differences in CKD content (what was shipped from Canada) between Chevrolet and Ford, as listed by Mike Cecil in the thread "Antipodean Ford CMPs" on the Old MLU Forum:
  • Chevrolet: all chassis and mechanicals, wheels. Rest manufactured locally: complete cabs, complete bodies, spare tyre rack and tool box.
  • Ford: all chassis, mechanicals, cab floor/lower cab frame, upper (windscreen) cab frame, doors, windscreen frames, front shell, wheels. Rest manufactured locally in Aust: cab floor, engine cover, cab back, roof, guards, spare wheel carrier & tool box, body.
CKD:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hanno Spoelstra View Post
To be more precise, may I quote from an earlier posting:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hanno Spoelstra View Post
CKD packs were not made up from previously assembled vehicles broken down for shipment, but basically they comprised the necessary numbers of subassemblies and parts for a given quantity of chassis. So the receiving assembly plant could mix 'n match components to whatever configuration was needed (this would also explain data plates with only chassis and contract numbers). Availability of components most likely played a role in how batches of trucks were put together to fill orders.

(*) CKD: Completely Knocked Down. CKD should not be confused with trucks being encased, after first being 'knocked down' as much as considered practical. CKD was restricted to destinations where the manufacturers had proper assembly plants. CKD entailed the supply of parts which could not - or not economically - be produced locally, supplemented by parts which could. Besides packing methods for trucks that had to be reassembled on arrival, the CKD-pack method was also used but this entailed parts and components which had not been assembled before and then dismantled for shipment. They comprised the necessary numbers of subassemblies and parts for a given quantity of chassis which would be assembled in much the same way as it was done in the Canadian factory.
Usually large trucks like the Mack were not shipped CKD, only partly knocked down. Read the articles on this subject in Wheels & Tracks magazine.
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  #197  
Old 04-11-20, 00:14
Bruce Parker Bruce Parker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Smith View Post
12 Cab Chev:
I'm only talking Chev 13 cab dash switch plates. The transmission/transfer case plates were brass (I have a brass on for my HUW) and later they were printed (decal?) on the engine cover. No such thing as a metal one with decals that I've ever seen.
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  #198  
Old 04-11-20, 00:38
Mike Cecil Mike Cecil is offline
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Thanks Hanno - must be a long time ago I posted that.

Still pretty much as I understand it, except Ford or a sub-contractor to Ford also produced wheels at some later date.

Chassis were apparently strapped together and packed in sets of 5 - think I remember that from a shipping loss report, but would have to check. Don't know if that was Ford or Chev (or both) imports to Aust. The VOL (ie the WW2 version of CES) was also partially imported, and partially from local sources.

The primary drivers for importation of partial vehicles was a combination of shipping space and the $$ exchange - Govt policy was to manufacture as much as possible locally to maintain jobs and spend Govt money in Australia supporting Aust industry, rather than incurring overseas debt.

This also applied to Lend Lease and the Canadian Mutual Aid program: make as much as could be in Australia for supply to Allies to offset the $$ value of things Aust could not manufacture, thereby minimising overseas debt.

Mike
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  #199  
Old 04-11-20, 02:03
Jacques Reed Jacques Reed is offline
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Default CKD CMP's

Thanks Hanno and Mike for that info.

I stand corrected on the way the CMP vehicles came into Australia i.e. CKD. At least I got most of the local content right.

Those posts were long before I joined MLU so it is good I caused them to be dusted off for the enlightenment of all. I am now a little wiser thanks to this forum and its contributors.

Cheers,
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  #200  
Old 10-11-20, 10:26
Jacques Reed Jacques Reed is offline
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Default F30/F60 Engine & Transmission Data Plate

Good Day,

I just received the prototype engine and transmission data plate from the laser engraver and I am very happy with the results. I liaised closely with him to make it as close to original as possible. I have already informed him to increase the left and right borders by 2 mm for those who spotted it.

As previously mentioned it is black anodized aluminium with the thin black anodizing, laser etched to reveal the aluminium beneath. The depth of the etching is microscopic, so no deep lettering or graphics.

Same material as original, aluminium, but a modern process to replicate the appearance.

Original F15-A plate is at top from which the common artwork was developed.
Middle scan is the F30/F60 prototype.
Bottom photo is an F60 plate from which the Auxiliary Transmission pattern was obtained and the relevant quantities for the larger trucks.

I will get them produced depending on interest shown. Anticipate they can be done for under $30 each. Will know exact amount once I have an idea of quantities to produce. PM me if interested.

Cheers,
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  #201  
Old 10-11-20, 11:04
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Default Plates

Looking great Jacques!

Any plans to do a FGT variation with the power take off and 42 gall fuel capacity?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques Reed View Post
Good Day,

I just received the prototype engine and transmission data plate from the laser engraver and I am very happy with the results. I liaised closely with him to make it as close to original as possible. I have already informed him to increase the left and right borders by 2 mm for those who spotted it.

As previously mentioned it is black anodized aluminium with the thin black anodizing, laser etched to reveal the aluminium beneath. The depth of the etching is microscopic, so no deep lettering or graphics.

Same material as original, aluminium, but a modern process to replicate the appearance.

Original F15-A plate is at top from which the common artwork was developed.
Middle scan is the F30/F60 prototype.
Bottom photo is an F60 plate from which the Auxiliary Transmission pattern was obtained and the relevant quantities for the larger trucks.

I will get them produced depending on interest shown. Anticipate they can be done for under $30 each. Will know exact amount once I have an idea of quantities to produce. PM me if interested.

Cheers,
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  #202  
Old 10-11-20, 15:47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques Reed View Post
Good Day,

I just received the prototype engine and transmission data plate from the laser engraver and I am very happy with the results. I liaised closely with him to make it as close to original as possible.
Cheers,
I made some of these up a few years back: http://www.mapleleafup.net/forums/showthread.php?t=4818

I noted at the time that there is a variation in spark plug gap .025 and .030 on different plates. Never got a response on why the difference.
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  #203  
Old 11-11-20, 22:18
Jacques Reed Jacques Reed is offline
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Default FGT Engine Transmission Data Plates

Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith Webb View Post
Looking great Jacques!

Any plans to do a FGT variation with the power take off and 42 gall fuel capacity?
Hi Keith,

I can ask the engraver if he can do it. Should be fairly easy to modify existing artwork.

I would just need a scan, or photo taken square on of the Auxiliary Transmission area of the plate and the capacity area. The rest of it would be a cut and paste from the existing common artwork. Doesn't have to be from a very good plate as long as I can make out the shift pattern. My F60 plate was a case in point.

Cheers,
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  #204  
Old 12-11-20, 04:28
Jacques Reed Jacques Reed is offline
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Default Ford CMP- Spark plug gap differences

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Smith View Post
I made some of these up a few years back: http://www.mapleleafup.net/forums/showthread.php?t=4818

I noted at the time that there is a variation in spark plug gap .025 and .030 on different plates. Never got a response on why the difference.
Tony,

I found in the attached pages from the British War Department "Special Pattern Vehicles" Two types of spark plugs are specified. Champion J-9 and Champion H-10 both with different 0.025" and 0.030" gaps respectively.

It also appears that at some time the plug type was changed in the parts lists.
Both a 1940 parts list and a 1943 parts list show part No. 52-12405 C as the earlier part and 01T 12405 a later part to be supplied when 52-12405 C is depleted. 01T 12405 is also specified in the 1943 parts list as a Champion #H-9.

"J" plugs have a 3/8" reach with the 0.025" gap
"H" plugs have a 7/16" reach with the 0.030" gap

Not sure why but for some reason they changed the type of spark plug to be used.

Cheers,
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