MLU FORUM  

Go Back   MLU FORUM > GENERAL WW2 TOPICS > The Wireless Forum

Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 24-01-23, 18:57
David Dunlop David Dunlop is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Winnipeg, MB
Posts: 3,341
Default Charging Set, 300-Watt Variations

There were a number of manufacturers of these charging sets during World War Two and shortly thereafter. I have several manuals for the ones built by Outboard Marine & Manufacturing Co. Of Canada Limited, based in Peterboro, Ontario and thought it might be helpful to post images of the various versions they made.

The first photo shows what is basically the standard wartime ‘Chorehorse’ for the Canadian and British Armies, side by side. On the left is the Charging Set 300-Watt MK I Canadian Pattern, OMC Model Number CHI-395-4. Note the use of a protective metal shroud over the Control Box as opposed to the steel rod cage employed on the British unit on the right. The designation for the British unit is; Charging Set, 300-Watt MK I British Pattern, with OMC Model Number CHI-395-5. Both these models are powered by the same 5/8-HP, single cylinder air cooled engine and the vast majority of parts are fully interchangeable. Both produce a 12-Volt DC output used for charging either a single 12-Volt Storage Battery, or two 6-Volt Storage Batteries in series.

The second photo is of the Charging Set 300-Watt Model CHI-397-2. This model was designed for use in the Army Office Lorry. It also has a 12-Volt DC output but the power plant is a 1.34-HP, single cylinder air cooled engine with a float feed carburetor, which requires a gravity feed gas tank. Only parts from the generator side of this model are interchangeable with the other two military sets.

The third photo is of a civilian Charging Set, 300-Watt, based on the wartime British Pattern unit, minus the Radio Filterette below the Control Box. Three models of this set were produced; EG1-300, EG2-300 and EG3-300. There is no mention at all in the manual of differences between the three and production was in the early 1950’s, so these model numbers might simply be based on the year of production: 1951, 1952 and 1953. These Charging Sets were targeting the rural farm electrification projects running in parts of Ontario and across the Canadian Prairies into the early 1960’s, in some locations. Getting Hydro Mains run to your farm was expensive, so DC 12-Volt Lighting Systems were very popular and these charging set show up quite regularly in these parts. These gasoline charging sets would be used to frequently compliment wind driven 12-Volt DC generators, which were still common to see sitting on old barns and farm houses, or free standing towers, well into the 1980’s in parts of Southern Manitoba, along with really ornate Lightening Rod setups.

There might be variations in design from other manufacturers in Britain, Canada and The United States, but these are the only manuals I have on hand.


David
Attached Thumbnails
OMC 300-Watt Charging Set 1.JPG   OMC 300-Watt Charging Set 2.JPG   OMC 300-Watt Charging Set 3.JPG  
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 24-01-23, 21:17
Bob Carriere Bob Carriere is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Hammond, Ontario
Posts: 5,117
Default Why is it....?

Hi David

Why is it that all the surplus models we acquired/available in the Ontario area were the British pattern with a cage and mostly converted to 24 volts?????

One of these days I must try to make one run!!!!

Bob C.
__________________
Bob Carriere....B.T.B
C15a Cab 11
Hammond, Ontario
Canada
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 24-01-23, 21:35
charlie fitton's Avatar
charlie fitton charlie fitton is offline
HLIofC - Normandy Pl
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Maryhill Ontario
Posts: 942
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Carriere View Post
Hi David

Why is it that all the surplus models we acquired/available in the Ontario area were the British pattern with a cage and mostly converted to 24 volts?????

Bob C.
My understanding is to make them NATO/ M series compatible. I once saw 3 in parallel set up to run a ground station for helicopter work.

f
__________________
Charles Fitton
Maryhill On.,
Canada

too many carriers
too many rovers
not enough time.
(and now a BSA...)
(and now a Triumph TRW...)
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 24-01-23, 21:45
charlie fitton's Avatar
charlie fitton charlie fitton is offline
HLIofC - Normandy Pl
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Maryhill Ontario
Posts: 942
Default 1937 chorehorse brochure...

I have several years of brochures (downloaded) - I hope this one works.

The chorehorse was presented as the maid of all labours..light, pump, butter churn, and to charge your radio batteries. Run an entire farm on 300 watts!

This flyer seems to be home oriented, but it would certainly work for a cottage...

The local flea market also had an example of the same unit that we know and love, but in 110v... kick myself for not buying it.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf CA_generator_1937.pdf (1.11 MB, 26 views)
__________________
Charles Fitton
Maryhill On.,
Canada

too many carriers
too many rovers
not enough time.
(and now a BSA...)
(and now a Triumph TRW...)
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 24-01-23, 22:12
David Dunlop David Dunlop is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Winnipeg, MB
Posts: 3,341
Default

Hi Bob.

I suspect two factors are at play here.

In the Manitoba area, the ratio of these charging sets found with the grill guard setup vs the metal shroud, or none at all, is easily in the order of 4 to 1, or higher, but most, if not all would have been Canadian Pattern Models. Very few true British Pattern Charging Sets are ever found out here. That tells me the Canadian Army quickly discovered the grill guard setup offered better protection for the charging set and vastly improved handling ability for Signals personnel who had to hump them back and forth for remote operations. The latter point is probably one that was not fully appreciated at the start of the war when wartime use of wireless was still not fully thought out. But all this likely prompted a changeover to the grill guard format protection in all subsequent Canadian Pattern Models at some point in the second half of the war, if not sooner.

We do run across 24-Volt units out here (with grill guards) and as Charlie pointed out, most if not all of these, are probably postwar conversions of wartime charging sets to meet the 24-Volt upgrades to the newer generations of Military Vehicles and Signals Equipment.


David
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 24-01-23, 23:26
Bob Carriere Bob Carriere is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Hammond, Ontario
Posts: 5,117
Default Odessa flea market of years ago......near Kingston...

..... the CMP early gathering at Odessa started out as a small part of the Odessa antique flea market..... there was a collector who showed up with a small flat trailer covered with all possible variety of these small generators.... some military some civilian, some with rope start, some with pedal start....... not a clue who he was.....wonder where that collection is now and whether it will ever surface again......
__________________
Bob Carriere....B.T.B
C15a Cab 11
Hammond, Ontario
Canada
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 25-01-23, 01:57
Mike Kelly's Avatar
Mike Kelly Mike Kelly is offline
Fan of Lord Nuffield
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Victoria Australia
Posts: 5,556
Default Nice

Quote:
Originally Posted by charlie fitton View Post
I have several years of brochures (downloaded) - I hope this one works.

The chorehorse was presented as the maid of all labours..light, pump, butter churn, and to charge your radio batteries. Run an entire farm on 300 watts!

This flyer seems to be home oriented, but it would certainly work for a cottage...

The local flea market also had an example of the same unit that we know and love, but in 110v... kick myself for not buying it.
Nice brochure ! do you have any more ?
__________________
1940 cab 11 C8
1940 Morris-Commercial PU
1941 Morris-Commercial CS8
1940 Chev. 15cwt GS Van ( Aust.)
1942-45 Jeep salad
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 27-01-23, 17:22
Mike Kelly's Avatar
Mike Kelly Mike Kelly is offline
Fan of Lord Nuffield
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Victoria Australia
Posts: 5,556
Default 1936 brochure

This is a 1936 brochure. The first model appears to have bewn released in 1936 , made in Illinois USA - the "Iron Horse"
I think the Canadian made version, renamed the "Chorehorse" was produced later.
Attached Thumbnails
Screenshot_2023-01-28-02-16-40.jpg   Screenshot_2023-01-28-02-12-25.jpg  
__________________
1940 cab 11 C8
1940 Morris-Commercial PU
1941 Morris-Commercial CS8
1940 Chev. 15cwt GS Van ( Aust.)
1942-45 Jeep salad

Last edited by Mike Kelly; 28-01-23 at 04:01.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 27-01-23, 19:46
Mike Kelly's Avatar
Mike Kelly Mike Kelly is offline
Fan of Lord Nuffield
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Victoria Australia
Posts: 5,556
Default Breville

A post war advert from Australia. Breville manufactured electrical appliances including domestic radios, the brand still exists today. Breville also made military standard multimeters during WW2. The Breville lighting plants may have been army surplus models that Breville badged as their own ?

Another Australian brand was 'Cooper', these were sold as single stand shearing plants and lighting plants.
Attached Thumbnails
Screenshot_2023-01-28-01-32-21.jpg   breville3.jpg   brev4.jpg   brev5.jpg   brev6.jpg  

__________________
1940 cab 11 C8
1940 Morris-Commercial PU
1941 Morris-Commercial CS8
1940 Chev. 15cwt GS Van ( Aust.)
1942-45 Jeep salad

Last edited by Mike Kelly; 28-01-23 at 03:31.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 28-01-23, 03:33
Mike Kelly's Avatar
Mike Kelly Mike Kelly is offline
Fan of Lord Nuffield
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Victoria Australia
Posts: 5,556
Default Shoe store

Go down to your shoe store and buy a Chorehorse !

1937 and 38 adverts for the earlier 'Iron Horse'.
Attached Thumbnails
brev7.jpg   iron1.jpg   iron2.jpg   iron3.jpg   iron4.jpg  

__________________
1940 cab 11 C8
1940 Morris-Commercial PU
1941 Morris-Commercial CS8
1940 Chev. 15cwt GS Van ( Aust.)
1942-45 Jeep salad

Last edited by Mike Kelly; 28-01-23 at 04:02.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 28-01-23, 03:58
Mike Kelly's Avatar
Mike Kelly Mike Kelly is offline
Fan of Lord Nuffield
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Victoria Australia
Posts: 5,556
Default 1000 miles from the city

1000 miles from the city
Attached Thumbnails
iron6.jpg   iron7.jpg   iron9.jpg   iron10.jpg   iron11.jpg  

__________________
1940 cab 11 C8
1940 Morris-Commercial PU
1941 Morris-Commercial CS8
1940 Chev. 15cwt GS Van ( Aust.)
1942-45 Jeep salad

Last edited by Mike Kelly; 28-01-23 at 04:10.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 28-01-23, 12:01
charlie fitton's Avatar
charlie fitton charlie fitton is offline
HLIofC - Normandy Pl
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Maryhill Ontario
Posts: 942
Default

Mike Kelly;Nice brochure ! do you have any more ?

Yes- Yes I do

And to add to the discussion - I think the engine is an Iron Horse - used for washing machines and the like, and the generator is a Chore Horse
Attached Files
File Type: pdf CA_generator_1939.pdf (816.1 KB, 14 views)
File Type: pdf CA_generator_1938.pdf (1.29 MB, 12 views)
File Type: pdf CA_generator_1946.pdf (379.3 KB, 13 views)
File Type: pdf CA_generator_1948.pdf (344.6 KB, 11 views)
File Type: pdf CA_power_light_water.pdf (909.2 KB, 11 views)
__________________
Charles Fitton
Maryhill On.,
Canada

too many carriers
too many rovers
not enough time.
(and now a BSA...)
(and now a Triumph TRW...)
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 15-11-23, 14:43
David Dunlop David Dunlop is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Winnipeg, MB
Posts: 3,341
Default

Does anyone have a manual with specifications for either the British or Canadian versions of these sets? Just looking through the two OMC manuals I have and realized no weights or dimensional data is provided in either.

David
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 15-11-23, 20:22
rob love rob love is offline
carrier mech
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Shilo MB, the armpit of Canada
Posts: 7,480
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Carriere View Post
Hi David

Why is it that all the surplus models we acquired/available in the Ontario area were the British pattern with a cage and mostly converted to 24 volts?????

One of these days I must try to make one run!!!!

Bob C.
In Canadian service, they were part of the C-42 radio sets, which were 24 volt. If you were in an observation post, you could have the chorehorse set back a little ways and with the exhaust pipe slightly buried, it made almost no noise. When the C42 radios went surplus in the early 1980s, the Saskatoon surplus store also got the chorehorses. Some were used, some were still new in their crates with their lend lease decals.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 16-11-23, 00:08
Alex van de Wetering Alex van de Wetering is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Hoofddorp, The Netherlands
Posts: 2,652
Default

It was my understanding that the ones without cage were intended for mounting on a vehicle (C8, C8A etc.) and the ones with cage were intended to be portable and to be used outside a vehicle, not necessary a difference between British and Canadian pattern (?).

Quote:
On the left is the Charging Set 300-Watt MK I Canadian Pattern, OMC Model Number CHI-395-4. Note the use of a protective metal shroud over the Control Box
I missed out one of these sets with the shroud a couple of years ago (even though Hanno and I did have a great CMP-border raid that day). In case anyone has one of these shrouds laying around; I am still interested in one for my C8. I do have two Chorse horse sets, but both with cage.
__________________
Chevrolet C8 cab 11 FFW
BSA Folding Bicycle
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 16-11-23, 01:42
David Dunlop David Dunlop is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Winnipeg, MB
Posts: 3,341
Default

By 1944, the photos and illustrations in the 52-Set Manual and the Truck and Ground Installation Instructions for the 19-Set both have the 300-Watt Chorehorse Canadian as being equipped with the guard assembly.

I would not at all be surprised that as soon as Canadian troops encountered the British Chorehorse in the field, with guard, it proved too popular and the Canadian version was simply dropped. The guard makes picking the Chorehorse up and carrying it, extremely easy, especially if you have just shut it down after a long run. That engine gets hot and stays hot for a while.


David
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 16-11-23, 01:46
Bob Carriere Bob Carriere is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Hammond, Ontario
Posts: 5,117
Default One of our Winter work projects.......

.... is to take one down from the barn attic and have a go at make it run....

This tread will be very useful...... David and Jordan stay tuned...!!!!
__________________
Bob Carriere....B.T.B
C15a Cab 11
Hammond, Ontario
Canada
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 16-11-23, 03:58
Colin Alford Colin Alford is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Barrie, ON
Posts: 363
Default

David,

I will attempt to fill in some of the gaps using these manuals. Collectively they cover CHI-395, CHI-395-1, CHI-395-2, CHI-395-3 (some prior to serial 27590 were designated Mk 1), CHI-395-4 (Mk1 Canadian), CHI-395-5 (Mk1 British), CHI-395-6 (Mk1 Star), CHI-396, CHI-397, CHI-397-1, CHI-397-2, and PU-5008/U (claimed to be modified CHI-395-6).
Attached Thumbnails
DFE19EE0-BD22-4161-819A-C4E7C9C004F1.jpg   5A3F7160-0E67-4883-821E-3107B2E673A1.jpg   257D30CB-156F-4714-8D2A-CCF164B35AA0.jpg   3B8CF793-CCDB-4BAB-A659-18CEDFD0924E.jpg  
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 16-11-23, 04:03
Colin Alford Colin Alford is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Barrie, ON
Posts: 363
Default

Weight and dimensions:

The Jan 1945 instructions for the CHI-395-6, and the Jan 1958 handbook for the PU-5008/U include the weight and dimensions.
Attached Thumbnails
6BB4BC76-02C2-4965-8CCA-A2BFB42E973E.jpg   EEAE8C2B-5010-435C-A00E-76634E1AF53D.jpg  
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 16-11-23, 04:18
Colin Alford Colin Alford is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Barrie, ON
Posts: 363
Default

The improvements for the Mk1 Star (CHI-395-6) appear to be a heat shield between the engine and fuel tank, a thick angled guard ( shield) to protect the bottom of the carburetor and air cleaner elbow, a modified tank with boss to accept carburetor guard, and an improved adjusting mechanism for the governor link.

While the handbook for the PU-5008/U claims that they are modified CHI-395-6, I have observed a number of local examples that do not have any of the CHI-395-6 features, which would indicate that they were modified from early CHI-395 types.
Attached Thumbnails
7C8330A3-F2A7-46EE-96A4-C24808EAFEDE.jpg   6DAB0375-028C-4E35-88C4-C564006173C9.jpg   E05F84BC-49EF-4C63-A881-2A357BC16605.jpeg   427DEAB5-6111-4E31-84CF-5EF3F044476C.jpg  
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 16-11-23, 04:25
Colin Alford Colin Alford is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Barrie, ON
Posts: 363
Default

Here are a couple of other images. It is certainly difficult to identify the specific model without looking at the data plate, as all models (military and civilian)with the frame guard are very visually similar from a couple of paces away.
Attached Thumbnails
E16E5552-DF93-4586-948D-F6686D59FA2B.jpg   02F222E5-3C1A-4AD5-90B3-5962EC0B9E68.jpeg  
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 16-11-23, 10:39
Bruce MacMillan Bruce MacMillan is offline
a Canuck/Brit in Blighty
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Hell Fire Corner, Kent UK
Posts: 688
Default

My M152 sigs van came with the 30V PU-5008/U mounted on the right front fender. It was made by OMC. The back of the truck was kitted for either the C42 or WS52. Under the main table was a large iron bracket for securing the 52 set.
Attached Thumbnails
5X250022.JPG   5X250023.JPG  
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 16-11-23, 16:46
David Dunlop David Dunlop is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Winnipeg, MB
Posts: 3,341
Default

Hi Colin.

Very nice assembly of manuals you have been able to put together.

I suspect a high level of part interchangeability within any given Brand, but do you get a sense of much in the way of parts swapping across the various brands?


David
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 16-11-23, 18:48
David Dunlop David Dunlop is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Winnipeg, MB
Posts: 3,341
Default

97 Pounds per unit all in. Yikes! And the majority of remote, or ground setups, calls for a pair of Chorehorses, plus two pairs of wireless batteries.

A 19-set ready to go on its Carriers No. 23 can just be carried by one man. Impossible task for a 52-Set. That beastie requires two men minimum carrying the set lengthwise between them. With two men in line, the set gets in the way of efficient movement. With four men, two at each end, in line movement is a piece of cake.

Colin. do your manuals show the canvas cover as always being part of the standard kit for the Chorehorse, or did it start showing up at some point following introduction? The 52-Set Manual recommends the operators use the issued cover at night to avoid condensation buildup on the Chorehorse. Keeping the magnetos dry perhaps.


David
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 17-11-23, 04:10
Mike Kelly's Avatar
Mike Kelly Mike Kelly is offline
Fan of Lord Nuffield
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Victoria Australia
Posts: 5,556
Default Pioneer version

I have seen a few 'Chorehorse like' generators, that are a variation of the Canadian WW2 military version, these 'different' sets were made by PIONEER Chicago USA. The USA wartime Pioneer version has two outputs, the usual 12V DC and a second 240V AC outlet. I think these USA Pioneer models have a slightly larger engine bore than the Canadian sets. A club member , Bevan F. had one of these USA Pioneer sets and it was used on a few club trips, charging batteries.

Official nomenclature for the Pioneer set: Power unit DC/AC 250 watts No.1 [American] [1A ]

From the Smokstack forum:

I have one that I bought in April 1970. I got it from Hughes Trading North Coburg , Melbourne. I still have the receipt ! Mine is a 12volt D.C. and 240 volt A.C. I was told that they were used on tanks. It had a cast iron base that was the petrol tank. If yours has the same type of petrol tank, it needs to cleaned out well and painted with petrol resisting paint. I had a lot of problems with fine rust stopping it from running. You should start it with a 12 volt battery. Mine needs the 12 volts to energize the winding, if it hasn't been used for some time. When I was using it the crank shaft snapped in half. I was unable to get another one from Hughes Trading. I made up a straight shaft and used the cast base. The cylinder, piston and head were removed. A pulley was fitted on to the shaft and was then driven by another engine. I still have it all but not used it for many years. I think I could still have the cylinder,piston and head.

Spotted on Epay https://www.ebay.com/itm/195622723669

https://www.ebay.com/itm/19604447633...gAAOSw-elcOCUU
__________________
1940 cab 11 C8
1940 Morris-Commercial PU
1941 Morris-Commercial CS8
1940 Chev. 15cwt GS Van ( Aust.)
1942-45 Jeep salad

Last edited by Mike Kelly; 17-11-23 at 04:35.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 17-11-23, 04:21
David Dunlop David Dunlop is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Winnipeg, MB
Posts: 3,341
Default

Hello Mike.

I hope your summer weather is finally arriving.

I think another US Army supplier of similar equipment might also have been Homelite. I recall seeing one in a local surplus shop in the early 80’s, but recall little else about it.

David
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 17-11-23, 04:58
Colin Alford Colin Alford is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Barrie, ON
Posts: 363
Default

David,

Despite the branding change from Johnson Motors to Outboard Marine and Manufacturing Co. of Canada Limited, my understanding is that these Canadian produced Charging Sets were all made in the same facility in Peterborough. They certainly used the same part numbers.

Mike has introduced an interesting side note. The Pioneer GEN-E-MOTOR gaskets in his eBay link have the same part number (53-54) as those used on the Chore Horse (some sort of license agreement???)
Attached Thumbnails
2499A72D-4504-46E1-B4CF-3E4BDC6B2878.jpg   FD07A54F-D82E-488A-A8DC-E31EC6BEDDBB.jpg   96D6623D-BFA9-49E6-A09D-C78FD01A15B7.jpg  
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 17-11-23, 05:15
Colin Alford Colin Alford is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Barrie, ON
Posts: 363
Default

David,

It appears that there were two different canvas covers. One for units without the frame guard, and another for units with the frame guard.

There are different part number formats evident in the parts lists. It would appear that during most of the development of these sets the part number format was xx-xx with up to 3 digits left of the dash, and up to 4 digits right of the dash. The later development (which also appears to be the militarization of the design) uses a 6 digit part number format.

With both canvas covers having 6 digit part numbers, I suspect that they were developed for military contracts. The parts list shows canvas covers applicable to all CHI-395, and CHI-396 models ( though not for-397 (office lorry) type).

I presume that a canvas cover was supplied with all military contract units.
Attached Thumbnails
14135030-4296-44D1-B0DA-8971F1FCBD7E.jpeg   E57D5804-B452-4166-810B-4787CB5C241E.jpg   FAD1FC67-8BBE-4D73-9BF4-E6D8C62996C7.jpeg   E5D9B321-E26B-46BD-BD7D-26F790023B8F.jpeg  
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 17-11-23, 06:45
Mike Kelly's Avatar
Mike Kelly Mike Kelly is offline
Fan of Lord Nuffield
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Victoria Australia
Posts: 5,556
Default Cover

Quote:
Originally Posted by Colin Alford View Post
David,

It appears that there were two different canvas covers. One for units without the frame guard, and another for units with the frame guard.


I have a NOS canvas cover for the frame guard type chorehorse.

Many years ago Aussie disposals stores had NOS chorehorse starting ropes with the wooden handle.
__________________
1940 cab 11 C8
1940 Morris-Commercial PU
1941 Morris-Commercial CS8
1940 Chev. 15cwt GS Van ( Aust.)
1942-45 Jeep salad

Last edited by Mike Kelly; 17-11-23 at 06:52.
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 17-11-23, 15:58
James D Teel II James D Teel II is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: Edmond, Oklahoma, USA
Posts: 133
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Colin Alford View Post
Mike has introduced an interesting side note. The Pioneer GEN-E-MOTOR gaskets in his eBay link have the same part number (53-54) as those used on the Chore Horse (some sort of license agreement???)
That the part numbers are the same makes perfect sense when you think of different manufacturers making the same item. It doesn't matter who makes it as long as it is the same. Also, that cut out on eBay falls in the same scheme. I'll probably pick one up as a spare, though they rarely go out.

Edited to add: I made an offer to the eBay seller of the cut outs and picked one up at a fair price.
__________________
V/R

James D. Teel II
Edmond, Oklahoma
Retired Police Sergeant/Bomb Tech
1943 Willys MB/ITM jeep
1942 SS Cars No1Mk1 LtWt trailer

Last edited by James D Teel II; 17-11-23 at 20:55.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Carrier Track Variations Lynn Eades The Carrier Forum 39 14-07-23 20:22
Carrier Pedal Variations Lynn Eades The Carrier Forum 19 02-05-19 10:06
Wanted: BSA 300 watt generator 41jeepers For Sale Or Wanted 0 29-04-14 14:16
BSA 300 watt Generator Neil Ashley WW2 Military History & Equipment 0 21-03-13 20:32
Mk 1 firing rest variations BCA The Carrier Forum 2 24-07-12 15:55


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 16:38.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2023, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © Maple Leaf Up, 2003-2016