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  #1  
Old 10-08-08, 12:34
Darren Witty Darren Witty is offline
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Location: Brisbane, Austrailia
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Default Can any one ID this radio

I just bought this radio at the markets. Can anyone help me with any information and what it may have been used for or in? Any wartime photos or photos from the manual?

On the ID plate:

TYPE -COL-52286
AIRCRAFT RADIO TRANSMITTER
66 POUNDS
SERIAL 1252-A
A unit of model ATC Aircraft Radio EQUIP
Manufactures for
NAVY DEPARTMENT
Bureau of Ships
Serial number 23218

Thanks
Darren
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  #2  
Old 10-08-08, 17:46
Bruce MacMillan Bruce MacMillan is offline
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It is a Second World War vintage transmitter. Used mostly in heavy aircraft. It was also used after the war by civilian airlines. It was made by Collins Radio. The navy called it the ATC and the airforce called it the AN/ART-13. Google both labels and you'll find a ton of stuff. You can download the manual from BAMA here: http://bama.sbc.edu/military.htm

Still in use by some ham radio operators. The autotune mechanism is neat.

Bruce
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  #3  
Old 10-08-08, 23:05
David Dunlop David Dunlop is offline
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Hello Darren

Nice find. Hope its all still original.

Further to Bruce's comments, you should be able to find a wealth of info on the net for this set. It was usually paired with the BC-348 Receiver, either the -Q or -R model. This receiver was known as the ARR-11 and the combined set was known as the ARC-8.

In the US Airforce and commercially, I believe it survived until the 1970's but the US Navy stopped using it in the 1950's.

Regards,

David
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  #4  
Old 11-08-08, 01:28
lynx42 lynx42 is offline
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Thanks for the link to that site, Bruce. But how do you log on? Tried the anonymous link but to no avail. Looks like a great site to belong too. Rick
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  #5  
Old 11-08-08, 03:12
Bruce MacMillan Bruce MacMillan is offline
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you get that login message if the site has reached the maximum number of users. There is no registration required. Try the mirror site at:
http://bama.edebris.com/manuals/miltest/
this site is much friendlier.

Bruce
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  #6  
Old 11-08-08, 07:14
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Mike Kelly Mike Kelly is offline
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Default Collins

Darren

Yes, its a ART 13 , one of the most famous aircraft transmitters built during WW2 ... If you make it to Corowa, have a chat to Andrew Tostevin, he has one on the air on the Ham radio 20 metre band.

They 'auto tune' , it's interesting watching them do it. The tuning dials are motor driven and they spin around to pre-set locations as you change channel. Remarkable in their day .. I believe they were kept in production post WW2 .. many civilian airlines used them . A large genemotor power supply ran from 24V. I had one, but too big and lots of messy about, and you need huge batteries or a large mains unit , with voltages over 1000, you really need to know what your doing .

They were a huge step up from the antique 1930's designed BC 375 series which used the similar receiver to the ART 13 .. the BC 348 . But the BC 375 still remained in service alongside the ART 13. I have a BC 191 here , the ground set version , which the BC 375 is derived from.

mike
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